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Old 10-10-2013, 09:28 PM   #1
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Stock to Shaker?

I'm sure this has been asked before, but I used the search function and couldn't find this particular question.
I would like to upgrade the sound in my Stang some time in the (hopefully) not to distant future. I came from an 07 with the Shaker 500 and that was plenty of bass for me. My 14 just has the stock radio and it just doesn't cut it.
I would like to keep the stock look at and adding door subs like the Shaker has would be amazing. But I don't imagine that the door panels are cheap... And I'm not sure how else it would be possible.
So any suggestions?

I've never put a system in myself, or really even looked at subs or anything of that nature. I would just like advice for which direction to take here
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Old 10-11-2013, 09:25 AM   #2
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If your looking for some base with out sounding like a high school kid rattling every panel on your car take a look at a powered enclosure. lots of different sizes and power levels to help you fill in the bottom end of your system.

I personally like going with a separate amp and sub because you have room for improvement should you want to upgrade at a later point and if you have a factory radio adding some form of remote gain control adds rather easy tuning for more or less base on the fly.
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Old 10-11-2013, 09:30 AM   #3
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I definitely don't want to rattle everything. I just want a little more than what's in it now.
I'm sorry but could you elaborate more on what you're suggesting?
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Old 10-11-2013, 10:29 AM   #4
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You could always go with a mono block amp or 2 channel amp and a single 10" or 12" sub with a ported enclosure and buy a crossover which taps into a speaker signal and provides your amp with a signal threw the rca's. this will allow you to keep your stock head unit and give you that extra thump you have been looking for, and it wont take up to much room if installed properly. Here is my setup. Its enough for me and made a big differance.

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Old 10-11-2013, 12:40 PM   #5
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GE3G's set up is what I was talking about in the second half of my post.

This
http://www.kicker.com/BassStation

Is what I was talking about in the first half. It's smaller and has the amp built into it. It's less power than a set up such as GE3S but that's not the point of the unit.

If I were you I would head to a few different shops if you have them near you and talk over what your looking for and what the shops think would be a good fit for you and see what you think you would like.
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Old 10-14-2013, 11:24 PM   #6
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Upgrading to subs in the doors is expensive, trust me. Also not the best way to get good bass, there just isn't enough room in the enclosures.

Your best bet is to put a sub in the trunk. I bought a custom-built box on eBay for $80 (2005 2013 Ford Mustang Custom Fit Single 10" Speaker Sub Box Subwoofer Enclosure | eBay) along with a really nice 10" sub and amp, and it is plenty of bass. Way more than the stock Shaker system if you dial it up. All told, I think I'm in it for $300 plus wiring/install.
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Old 10-15-2013, 09:35 AM   #7
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Thank you guys for the replies.
It's kind of difficult to get to the shop before they close be sure of my schedule, but I have called and talked to a few people.
I appreciate the help.
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Old 10-22-2013, 12:04 PM   #8
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so I have a base 13' mustang v6 and your saying there's a hookup for an amp and a sub on the stock head unit?
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Old 10-22-2013, 12:24 PM   #9
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so I have a base 13' mustang v6 and your saying there's a hookup for an amp and a sub on the stock head unit?
No you need to use a line output converter.

http://www.sonicelectronix.com/cat_m...onverters.html

You splice into your rear speaker lines to pull a usable low level signal and a way to plug in your RCAs.



Then for getting power to your amp you get a hook up kit so you can get power back to your amp.

http://www.sonicelectronix.com/viewc...%5BIgnore%5D=1
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Old 10-22-2013, 12:30 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by Tec_ View Post
No you need to use a line output converter.

PAC Line-Out Converters | Car Amplifier Installation | Car Audio/Video Installation | Car Audio at Sonic Electronix

You splice into your rear speaker lines to pull a usable low level signal and a way to plug in your RCAs.



Then for getting power to your amp you get a hook up kit so you can get power back to your amp.

Amplifier Wiring Kits at Sonic Electronix
So how did GE3G do it and has anyone done that before
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Old 10-22-2013, 01:13 PM   #11
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So how did GE3G do it and has anyone done that before

The way I described above. He just called his line output converter a crossover. A crossover is a filter that is used to separate highs and lows. Aftermarket component speakers have crossovers with 2 inputs ( + - ) and 4 outputs (tweeter + - and woofer + -)


So the wires that are running in to your speakers (a + and - ) contain what's considered a high level signal. A high level signal is capable of driving a speaker because it's all reddy been amplified by your factory radio. If you took that high level signal and attempted to amplify it it's going to start to clip and distort. So you use a line output converter to tap into your high level signal and get a low level signal that would not be able to power your speaker but your amp can then amplify it with out distorting it.


When using a line output converter you want to make sure your amplifier has a low pass filter on it because the signal you are grabbing will be a full range signal containing everything your speakers play and we only want the base to be amplified. So you set the low pass filter to around 60-80 hz and it will block all the higher frequency music and only play our base.


A aftermarket radio will have what are called preouts that you can plug your RCAs into and have the low pass filters built in so you don't have to bother with a line output converter.


Some amps give you the option to use high level inputs instead of low level so you don't need a line output converter but I recommend against going that rout as they are not terribly effective and can cause unwanted distortion.
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Old 10-22-2013, 01:20 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by Tec_ View Post
The way I described above. He just called his line output converter a crossover. A crossover is a filter that is used to separate highs and lows. Aftermarket component speakers have crossovers with 2 inputs ( + - ) and 4 outputs (tweeter + - and woofer + -) So the wires that are running in to your speakers (a + and - ) contain what's considered a high level signal. A high level signal is capable of driving a speaker because it's all reddy been amplified by your factory radio. If you took that high level signal and attempted to amplify it it's going to start to clip and distort. So you use a line output converter to tap into your high level signal and get a low level signal that would not be able to power your speaker but your amp can then amplify it with out distorting it. When using a line output converter you want to make sure your amplifier has a low pass filter on it because the signal you are grabbing will be a full range signal containing everything your speakers play and we only want the base to be amplified. So you set the low pass filter to around 60-80 hz and it will block all the higher frequency music and only play our base. A aftermarket radio will have what are called preouts that you can plug your RCAs into and have the low pass filters built in so you don't have to bother with a line output converter. Some amps give you the option to use high level inputs instead of low level so you don't need a line output converter but I recommend against going that rout as they are not terribly effective and can cause unwanted distortion.
So pretty much what's happening is it's pulling the highs and lows from the rear speakers and pumping them through the subwoofer?
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Old 10-22-2013, 01:29 PM   #13
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So pretty much what's happening is it's pulling the highs and lows from the rear speakers and pumping them through the subwoofer?
Close you pull both signals from the rear and then use the low pass filter in the aftermarket amp to block all the highs and only play the lows.
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Old 10-22-2013, 01:31 PM   #14
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Close you pull both signals from the rear and then use the low pass filter in the aftermarket amp to block all the highs and only play the lows.
will a shop do this or is this one of the installs shops wont really mess with and you do on your own. I can do it I just want make sure its done right and not waste a bunch of money.
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Old 10-22-2013, 01:40 PM   #15
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and which line out converter do you recommend from that link you sent

---------- Post added at 02:40 PM ---------- Previous post was at 02:39 PM ----------

Quote:
Originally Posted by GE3G View Post
You could always go with a mono block amp or 2 channel amp and a single 10" or 12" sub with a ported enclosure and buy a crossover which taps into a speaker signal and provides your amp with a signal threw the rca's. this will allow you to keep your stock head unit and give you that extra thump you have been looking for, and it wont take up to much room if installed properly. Here is my setup. Its enough for me and made a big differance.

Attachment 132157



Attachment 132158
can you post more pictures of your setup like your line out converter and how you did it
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Old 10-22-2013, 01:47 PM   #16
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will a shop do this or is this one of the installs shops wont really mess with and you do on your own. I can do it I just want make sure its done right and not waste a bunch of money.
Any good car audio shop can do the install for you. The only things that can be tricky could be
-finding switched power for your remote turn on wire.
-figuring out what wires on your speakers are positive and negative
-how your going to run your power wire
-tuning the system

But if you take your time and do your homework you can easily do it your self. And most shops will tune a system installed elsewhere for a fee if you feel comfortable with the install but not the tuning.
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Old 10-22-2013, 01:53 PM   #17
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a guy on another forum took really good pictures on how to run the power wire and he said you can grab power from the antenna because in the 13's the antenna is actually powered so I guess that could work for the remote turn on. but finding the positive and negative will be tough and I will probably have someone else tune the system.

---------- Post added at 02:53 PM ---------- Previous post was at 02:51 PM ----------

the only thing i'm nervous about is if I got the right subwoofer and box in the back can I really make this thing slam from doing this or is not worth it.
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Old 10-22-2013, 02:03 PM   #18
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a guy on another forum took really good pictures on how to run the power wire and he said you can grab power from the antenna because in the 13's the antenna is actually powered so I guess that could work for the remote turn on. but finding the positive and negative will be tough and I will probably have someone else tune the system. ---------- Post added at 02:53 PM ---------- Previous post was at 02:51 PM ---------- the only thing i'm nervous about is if I got the right subwoofer and box in the back can I really make this thing slam from doing this or is not worth it.
This is mine in my 05 don't have a pic of my box and speaker at the moment.


I'm running a 1000W rms kicker amp into a 600w MTX sub that hasn't blown yet. Plan is to beat it to death then grab a kicker L7.

Just make sure your amp RMS wattage matches your subs RMS wattage or is higher (you can always adjust it down for smaller subs) and make sure your box you buy or build has the correct volume of air your speaker requires.
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Old 10-22-2013, 03:22 PM   #19
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Most amps have a LPF setting but if your getting ur signal threw a speaker your still not gett 100% low freq signal but its close enough
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Old 10-22-2013, 03:37 PM   #20
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Most amps have a LPF setting but if your getting ur signal threw a speaker your still not gett 100% low freq signal but its close enough
True. That's why if your doing a SQ set up you use a audio processor.
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