Is harder to own a classic muscle car than a modern one? - Mustang Evolution

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Old 12-10-2011, 04:30 PM   #1
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Is harder to own a classic muscle car than a modern one?

well i was thinking of getting a mustang gt but then i saw a 1966 mustang for $10k , it only has a v6 engine but i dont care if its fast or not,at long as it runs and looks good, but is it worth it? can you even put insurance in it and is it expensive?is it hard to maintain it,do they break down easier?
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Old 12-10-2011, 05:18 PM   #2
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Is harder to own a classic muscle car than a modern one?

1st off, practically ANYTHING can be insured. there are insurance policies out on some of the oddest things....
any car driven, 2012 or 1920's, on any public road in any state of the US is REQUIRED by law to be insured. liability only at the minimum.


60's and early 70's vehicles had breaker point ignitions, which need new points every 10k and adjustment every oil change to keep them in the proper dwell range through the entire 10k (or just replace them every oil change, they are CHEAP).
very simple carbs, with little or NOTHING in the way of emissions equipment.

just incredibly simple to work with. beyond the basic hand tools, a 12 volt test light, a multimeter, dwell meter and a timing light covers EVERYTHING.

and you can relatively easily and cheaply switch over to a slightly more modern ignition system, one without breaker points. you'll still be doing 10k tuneups, but there will be less to do and your performance wont be constantly effected by ever changing dwell.

the older vehicles, the muscle car era, they are tinker toys. incredibly simple, IF you understand auto mechanics at all.


newer vehicles, lighter to begin with which is a serious advantage.
fuel injection allows for better mixing of air and fuel, which means a better burn, which means more power with less fuel consumption.
better trannies with more gears that let you get better mpg's too.

and when one the hundreds of parts it has an older car doesnt have does begin to have problems, check engine light turns on and the computer TELLS you where the problem is.

and lets definetly not forget the brakes.
60's 4 wheel drums was still the thing, and ABS didnt exist. today you'll get 4 wheel disc, which has MUCH more stopping power, and possibly ABS to help avoid an accident (i KNOW ABS saved my bacon at least once, i would of slid out and hit a cop car if the tires had locked up, i was a new driver and i just planted my foot down HARD on the petal in response to everybody being STOPPED just around the corner from me).
and again, lighter cars, which are easier to stop.

its plain and simply STUPID to take an older vehicle and try to use it as a daily driver without upgrading to a more modern and more powerful braking system. you WILL rear end one of those new cars sooner or later when they stop in much less space then you NEED.



personally if i was building a classic car, something like a mid to late 60's mustang, i'd go find a newer (01 at the oldest) truck of the brand i like (chevy) in the junk yards witha v8 in it and completely gut it. motor, tranny, computer to control them, rear axle with its braking system (usually easier to swap out axles then to convert from drums to disc on an OLD axle), EVERYTHING but the body and the frame.
get good power, with better mileage, and all the realiability advantages offered by todays vehicles. and the braking system to make it safe to share the roads with modern vehicles.





bottom line, the older vehicles are easier to maintain for less with less. but they arent as reliable.
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Old 12-10-2011, 05:26 PM   #3
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Is harder to own a classic muscle car than a modern one?

If you are going to buy an old car, you should learn something about them, for example you should know that Ford didn't put a V6 in any Mustang until the Mustang II in the 70's. That car would have either a straight 6 or V8.

Insuring one shouldn't be an issue (call for quotes), but they do require more maintenance than a new car. As for reliability, they should be OK, but you are talking about a 45 year old car here - how much has been replaced/updated? If it's very original there is more to go wrong, if it was updated at all (for example many people have replaced points with an electronic ignition in old cars like that) it will be better.

For sure get it looked at by a mechanic before you buy it.
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Old 12-10-2011, 06:20 PM   #4
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Is harder to own a classic muscle car than a modern one?

It's harder to own a classic Mustang. Even if you bought a restored Mustang, it'll have rattles, maybe no AC, handle and turns like a tractor, unsafe(lap belt only, gas tank), no power brakes, most likely not even disc brakes, easily stolen, some where they still have P185/78R13 tires around.

Well people drove them before, but we are spoiled my modern technology and people drove more carefully without talking on phones or stuffing fries in their mouths in their huge SUV. It's possible for a classic to be a daily driver but not easy.
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Old 12-10-2011, 07:00 PM   #5
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Is harder to own a classic muscle car than a modern one?

You might be better off getting a V8 at that price. It will retain better value with a V8
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Old 12-10-2011, 07:27 PM   #6
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Is harder to own a classic muscle car than a modern one?

This is one of those questions that I adore because there are so many variables to deal with and it's about classic Mustangs.

As a previous owner of 2 of them ('67 & '68) you need to start out with something that's been restored and the restoration was complete and done competently. I'm not talking about a nice shiny paint job and reupholstered seats. They need to get down to the floorpan and remove the rusted out metal and replace most of the parts in the drivetrain, brakes, electrical and so on.....
Finding spare parts can be a really big hassle for a 45 year old car and you don't want to do that when you have to use it to go to work tomorrow.
Yes they can be insured to drive on the street but, most people that own classic cars don't use them for day-to-day use, it's more of a weekend/special occasion thing. Your rates will depend more on your driving history than anything else unless, you go for full coverage.
The amount of maintenance goes up dramatically when you deal with older cars. In the old days, a car was using older technology (systems were more mechanically controlled and didn't use much electronic controls) and a lot of the things that need "looking after" are things that you wouldn't even consider these days. You may even have to get used to setting a choke for starting the engine and then slowly backing it off as the motor warmed up; while you drive at the same time.
As far as breakdowns are concerned; it depends a lot more on well the car is maintained, but they do have a tendency to breakdown a little more often, because of the older technology. A good example of this is... a 1960's car used points and condenser inside the distributor (now they use coil packs and electronics to do this job) and about every three months you have to clean the points because they get out of gap and dirty or become too pitted and have to be replaced. That's just one little thing (in about 100 little things) that can cause your engine to not start up or run well.
Do you get the idea ???

BTW; in 1966 the Mustang used an in-line 6 cylinder engine with a one barrel carburetor. (that had the power of a modern 4 cylinder) They didn't come with V6's.
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