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Old 07-01-2012, 06:49 PM   #1
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what's this AC line called.

I need help with the name of the AC line that goes from the firewall, to the radiator? It's got a hole in it so I need to replace it. It is getting to hot to not have AC I have decided. Thanks.
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Old 07-01-2012, 07:04 PM   #2
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Which one ?
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Old 07-01-2012, 07:16 PM   #3
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Wow you provided the pictures, that is service Haha. But the second picture.
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Old 07-03-2012, 04:03 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Voltage258
I need help with the name of the AC line that goes from the firewall, to the radiator? It's got a hole in it so I need to replace it. It is getting to hot to not have AC I have decided. Thanks.
That's the liquid line. If your AC is not charged, the heat from the manifold will melt it!. That means its just an empty hose. I got a replacement from Orileys for about $30 after my High pressure valve blew..

The one with the valve you pointed at is the low pressure line. The valve next to the radiator is the high pressure side. Get new valves for both. Note the type. It may not be a Schrader, mine weren't.

---------- Post added at 05:03 AM ---------- Previous post was at 05:01 AM ----------

Quote:
Originally Posted by LAS97GT

That's the liquid line. If your AC is not charged, the heat from the manifold will melt it!. That means its just an empty hose. I got a replacement from Orileys for about $30 after my High pressure valve blew..

The one with the valve you pointed at is the low pressure line. The valve next to the radiator is the high pressure side. Get new valves for both. Note the type. It may not be a Schrader, mine weren't.
Oh, pics provided by O2pony.
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Old 07-03-2012, 05:38 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LAS97GT

That's the liquid line. If your AC is not charged, the heat from the manifold will melt it!. That means its just an empty hose. I got a replacement from Orileys for about $30 after my High pressure valve blew..

The one with the valve you pointed at is the low pressure line. The valve next to the radiator is the high pressure side. Get new valves for both. Note the type. It may not be a Schrader, mine weren't.

---------- Post added at 05:03 AM ---------- Previous post was at 05:01 AM ----------



Oh, pics provided by O2pony.
We're they hard to replace?
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Old 07-03-2012, 07:52 PM   #6
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Re: what's this AC line called.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Voltage258 View Post
We're they hard to replace?
Actually, no the line is easy to replace. Autozone or any similar store sells the disconnectors. The little white washer looking thingies are supposed to be for that purpose but I wouldnt waste my time with it. Essentially, the disconnectors are made of plastic, and color coded. find the one that fits closest to you tube diameter, then slide it up and disconnect the lines. Before you attempt any disconnect you must take it to a licensed pro to evacuate (empty) the freon form the system. It takes special equiment to do it. Considering that you line is already empty since you have a hole in it. re-install the new line. it takes a few short minutes, 15 at most. Avoid driving the car, or you can choose another option (use a temporary stra to pull the hose up from the manifold). I displaced mine permanently by 2 inches ( BBK shortys run real hot even when wrapped with fiber glass).

The Tech will then test your Hvac system for leaks (about 20 mins or so), if your system passes, ie no leaks, the tech will charge the system. If you dont pass the leak test, he should not charge you for anything but the service for hooking up and testing your system. Loading freon (R134) takes a bit. They should charge you for the service and amount of pounds you need to load you AC system. Cant remember mine but its was less than 5 pounds.

PS when connecting the lines, the AC tech has extra oil that you can use to lubricate the rubber o-rings. this could be a little tricky. all o-rings must be seated properly. How you know you got it right? when you seat the line it does not push itself out, or you feel it gently click (sorta). Big no no is to have the rubber bushings stretch outside of its groove, so fit it and disconnect then refit it again will give you confidence you did it right.

Keep me posted. PS I hate AC problems.

---------- Post added at 08:52 PM ---------- Previous post was at 08:44 PM ----------

Quote:
Originally Posted by LAS97GT View Post
Actually, no the line is easy to replace. Autozone or any similar store sells the disconnectors. The little white washer looking thingies are supposed to be for that purpose but I wouldnt waste my time with it. Essentially, the disconnectors are made of plastic, and color coded. find the one that fits closest to you tube diameter, then slide it up and disconnect the lines. Before you attempt any disconnect you must take it to a licensed pro to evacuate (empty) the freon form the system. It takes special equiment to do it. Considering that you line is already empty since you have a hole in it. re-install the new line. it takes a few short minutes, 15 at most. Avoid driving the car, or you can choose another option (use a temporary stra to pull the hose up from the manifold). I displaced mine permanently by 2 inches ( BBK shortys run real hot even when wrapped with fiber glass).

The Tech will then test your Hvac system for leaks (about 20 mins or so), if your system passes, ie no leaks, the tech will charge the system. If you dont pass the leak test, he should not charge you for anything but the service for hooking up and testing your system. Loading freon (R134) takes a bit. They should charge you for the service and amount of pounds you need to load you AC system. Cant remember mine but its was less than 5 pounds.

PS when connecting the lines, the AC tech has extra oil that you can use to lubricate the rubber o-rings. this could be a little tricky. all o-rings must be seated properly. How you know you got it right? when you seat the line it does not push itself out, or you feel it gently click (sorta). Big no no is to have the rubber bushings stretch outside of its groove, so fit it and disconnect then refit it again will give you confidence you did it right.

Keep me posted. PS I hate AC problems.
I dont think I got the weight right on the freon. When tech is finished loading, he will have you start your engine, run the ac on max, and engage the engine at 2K rpm and holdit there. This is the final load on the system to verify the system is fully loaded (cant recall correctly_daft). Anyways, that tests the AC to ensure its blowing (((((COLD))))).

Replace the high and low pressure valves before charging though (unless they are under a decade old or less).
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Old 07-03-2012, 08:14 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LAS97GT
Actually, no the line is easy to replace. Autozone or any similar store sells the disconnectors. The little white washer looking thingies are supposed to be for that purpose but I wouldnt waste my time with it. Essentially, the disconnectors are made of plastic, and color coded. find the one that fits closest to you tube diameter, then slide it up and disconnect the lines. Before you attempt any disconnect you must take it to a licensed pro to evacuate (empty) the freon form the system. It takes special equiment to do it. Considering that you line is already empty since you have a hole in it. re-install the new line. it takes a few short minutes, 15 at most. Avoid driving the car, or you can choose another option (use a temporary stra to pull the hose up from the manifold). I displaced mine permanently by 2 inches ( BBK shortys run real hot even when wrapped with fiber glass).

The Tech will then test your Hvac system for leaks (about 20 mins or so), if your system passes, ie no leaks, the tech will charge the system. If you dont pass the leak test, he should not charge you for anything but the service for hooking up and testing your system. Loading freon (R134) takes a bit. They should charge you for the service and amount of pounds you need to load you AC system. Cant remember mine but its was less than 5 pounds.

PS when connecting the lines, the AC tech has extra oil that you can use to lubricate the rubber o-rings. this could be a little tricky. all o-rings must be seated properly. How you know you got it right? when you seat the line it does not push itself out, or you feel it gently click (sorta). Big no no is to have the rubber bushings stretch outside of its groove, so fit it and disconnect then refit it again will give you confidence you did it right.

Keep me posted. PS I hate AC problems.

---------- Post added at 08:52 PM ---------- Previous post was at 08:44 PM ----------


I dont think I got the weight right on the freon. When tech is finished loading, he will have you start your engine, run the ac on max, and engage the engine at 2K rpm and holdit there. This is the final load on the system to verify the system is fully loaded (cant recall correctly_daft). Anyways, that tests the AC to ensure its blowing (((((COLD))))).

Replace the high and low pressure valves before charging though (unless they are under a decade old or less).
So your basically telling me I have to take it somewhere to change this line?
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Old 07-03-2012, 09:31 PM   #8
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Voltage, will your A/C still run, just not cool cause of the freon leaking out?
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Old 07-03-2012, 10:02 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Azure
Voltage, will your A/C still run, just not cool cause of the freon leaking out?
Nope the nothing turns on nothing changes.
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Old 07-03-2012, 10:09 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Voltage258

Nope the nothing turns on nothing changes.
Reason I ask is if it would run and just not cool good or like a slow leak, you could add some freon to keep contaminants out of your A/C lines. Sounds like its a big leak then. Once repaired, they should vacuum your system real good to make sure there is no moisture, etc residing in the freon oil left in the compressor and lines.
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Old 07-03-2012, 10:19 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Azure

Reason I ask is if it would run and just not cool good or like a slow leak, you could add some freon to keep contaminants out of your A/C lines. Sounds like its a big leak then. Once repaired, they should vacuum your system real good to make sure there is no moisture, etc residing in the freon oil left in the compressor and lines.
Alright thanks and yea its a pretty big hole. It literally looks like it was sheared off on the side. I'm thinking the CAI heat shield wire it down.
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Old 07-04-2012, 08:10 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Voltage258

So your basically telling me I have to take it somewhere to change this line?
Not really, but not sure if canned AC is going to do the trick. If you want to make sure it's 100%. Have a pro fill it. You can change the line your self, but figure out how it broke in the first place. There's no way you still have a charge in the line. Also the comp has to be primed with about 6-8ml of AC lubricant. You have to get it right or risk losing the comp down the road. Just saying, not telling.
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Old 07-04-2012, 10:07 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LAS97GT

Not really, but not sure if canned AC is going to do the trick. If you want to make sure it's 100%. Have a pro fill it. You can change the line your self, but figure out how it broke in the first place. There's no way you still have a charge in the line. Also the comp has to be primed with about 6-8ml of AC lubricant. You have to get it right or risk losing the comp down the road. Just saying, not telling.
+1 I was thinking if it still had some press in it, using canned to keep the press positive would be good to keep contaminants out till he gets it fixed.
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Old 07-04-2012, 12:16 PM   #14
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Alright thanks guys. I will probably just take it somewhere tomorrow.
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