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Old 04-10-2014, 03:11 PM   #1
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Transmission shifting

Ok, so I'm new to Ford and how they do what they do. I've driven many manual trans cars over the years and I'll be honest and say that I never read the owner's manual, so if this info was listed for Chevy, Datsun or Toyota, I never saw it.

I was flipping through the owners manual and came across this:
Manual Transmissions: Using the Clutch
1. Make sure the parking brake is fully set.
2. Press the clutch pedal to the
floor, then put the gearshift lever in
the neutral position.
3. Start the engine.
4. Press the brake pedal and move
the gearshift lever to the desired
gear; position 1 or position R.
5. Release the parking brake, then
slowly release the clutch pedal
while slowly pressing on the
accelerator.

During each shift, the clutch pedal must be fully pressed to the floor.
Make sure the floor mat is properly positioned so it does not interfere
with the full extension of the clutch pedal.
Note: Failure to fully press the clutch pedal to the floor may cause
increased shift efforts, prematurely wear transmission components or
damage the transmission.


Is this really a requirement or just some suggestion that Ford makes? I only apply enough clutch to disengage the gear and shift. All the way to floor sounds like a lot of wasted effort when the clutch engages about 50% out.

Sorry if this sounds like a dumb question, but I've never heard anybody suggest that the clutch HAS to be pushed to the floor each use. Thanks for any feedback.
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Old 04-10-2014, 03:55 PM   #2
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Haha I've never read my owners manual either, I think they just put that in there to protect their ***. I usually clutch halfway in during normal driving even though mine catches at the top.
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Old 04-10-2014, 04:14 PM   #3
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My clutch has various engagement points, sometimes it's on the floor, other times, it's at the top of the travel.

I typically push the clutch all the way in, if I don't, I usually get grinding.

If I wouldn't lose my ***, I would have gotten rid of my 2014 months ago, simply because of how terrible the MT82 is. That's sad considering I bought it brand new at the end of August.

Once I get a few other projects finished up, I plan on swapping in a Tremec and ridding myself of this pile of crap.
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Old 04-10-2014, 06:03 PM   #4
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I think the clutch engagement point can vary a bit from car to car, so Ford just covers all possibilities this way. If one has a variable engagement point in the same car, I would suspect air or moisture in the clutch fluid. Both will expand or create vapor causing a variable engagement with different temperatures.
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Old 04-10-2014, 07:02 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WJBertrand View Post
I think the clutch engagement point can vary a bit from car to car, so Ford just covers all possibilities this way. If one has a variable engagement point in the same car, I would suspect air or moisture in the clutch fluid. Both will expand or create vapor causing a variable engagement with different temperatures.
That makes complete sense. However, Ford claims that it is normal..
As mentioned, it's just Fords way of covering their asses.
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Old 04-10-2014, 07:30 PM   #6
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I thought so. I felt stupid asking this question as it didn't make sense that you HAVE to go all the way to the floor. I figured it a mechanical process and should work just fine the way I'm doing it. I'm going back to the old method of trying everything first and reading the manual as a last resort!!!
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Old 04-10-2014, 11:37 PM   #7
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Clutch should reach the floor. Effort? You're kidding right? It is no effort either way. Nothing will really happen BUT it will prematurely wear.
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Old 04-11-2014, 08:47 AM   #8
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Explain yourself. The clutch does reach the floor so no issue there. Effort? It's called efficiency. Why perform more than is needed to get the job done? If the clutch disengages the gears and allows for engagement at 50%, then why push 100% if it's not needed. I'm not referring to effort as in work effort. There are many definitions for it.

1. It means the exertions of physical power
2. an ernest OR strenuous attempt
3. an achievement
4. the amount of exertion expended for a specified purpose

Also, if the clutch disengages and allows for reengagement, where is the premature wear coming from? It was disengaged. There's actually less slippage of the clutch plates if the shift happens quicker and smoother.
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Old 04-11-2014, 10:04 AM   #9
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Simply put, the clutch is shifting gears while slipping when it is not fully engaged. The better or newer the clutch, the less likely to notice anything, but synchros and clutch will wear faster. You do not need to press the clutch all the way into allow enough freedom to move the shifter, however it is not fully disengaged or engaged. The varying points from car to car of "engagement" point as described by some comments is simply the point on THAT car's specific wear where the plate and clutch have juuussstt enough friction to maintain a speed or gear. This does and will wear your clutch faster. Now, is it neglibible? On a car that is raced often or has a lot of power, I would say not.

Now to your point about the less slippage of the clutch plate if it happens quicker and smoother. That is the opposite actually. A half press IS slippage. Literally. You are not avoiding slippage, you are causing it. This isn't news to the world in 2014. This is a fact.

The best thing for shifting is to engage and disengage very quickly, but that would result in a crap ride and motor mounts would die quicker. So no matter how you pain it, half pressing a clutch is premature wear. How quick or much is dependent on so many variables that it is imeasurable.
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Old 04-11-2014, 10:28 AM   #10
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Normal shifting:

-Let off gas a bit
-Push clutch to floor
-Shift
-Let clutch out
-back on gas if needed

All in one smooth motion

Power shifting:

-Gas pedal to floor
-Start to press the clutch in
-Slam into the next gear and if you time it right it'll go right in
-Take foot off clutch before you bounce off the limiter (this is all done really effing fast btw)

Not rocket science.
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Old 04-11-2014, 11:09 AM   #11
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Just an FYI that by not pushing the clutch to the floor does not mean I'm power shifting. You can drive casually and smoothly without slamming into gears.
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Old 04-11-2014, 12:29 PM   #12
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Nope it doesn't, you get a feel for when your clutch disengages after awhile but it also depends on if you have a properly adjusted OEM setup too. Too many ppl run junk aftermarket cables or godawful quadrants or their cheap firewall adjuster that uses a set screw comes loose and starts to slacken the cable etc... I am speaking in general terms though.
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