Brake upgrade for better stopping power: just pads or full kit? - Page 2 - Mustang Evolution

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Old 09-03-2014, 02:21 PM   #36
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Great thread! Thanks for the read and education
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Old 09-04-2014, 12:31 AM   #37
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Now this definitely has left me speechless. I couldn't believe how misguided I was when it came to brakes, thanks a million for taking your time and educating everyone including me who has read/is going to read this thread. Definitely worth an eye opener.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BadCon View Post
1. I am talking different levels of grip. All factors such as tire width, tread pattern, compound, and diameter influence this variable. Purely speaking, I'm talking about a tires performance category. A max performance summer tire is going to offer more "grip" in ideal conditions then an all-season tire.

On a car with 225 series all season tires, you are not going to shorten stopping distances by installing a "Big Brake Kit." Your deceleration rate is limited by the traction provided by the tires, and not the clamping force of the calipers on the rotors. So for a single stop from 60mph to 0, your stopping distances will be identical whether you are using the "standard" brakes, or an upgraded big brake kit.

Now, if we reach the thermal limit of the standard brakes by employing multiple stops at high speed, THAT is when a big brake kit is needed. Another alternative is to simply upgrade the thermal capacity of the standard system by using higher performance brake pads, better fluid, etc. However there are limits and eventually you'll need to go with a big brake kit. But for a street driven car, or even one which see's an autocross track, this shouldn't be necessary if cost is a factor. By that I mean, a big brake kit is NEVER a bad thing, but the stock system can also be upgraded and shouldn't be overlooked if budget is a factor.

Not to make this anymore confusing, but if we replace that 225 series all-season tire with something like a 300 series racing slick, you will reach the limits of the stock brake system much sooner simply because the tires offer more traction.
Theoretically, there is a point where you would need a big brake kit even with a single stop from 60mph...that is because the tires offer so much grip that extreme temperatures can be generated on a single stop, which would result in brake fade before the car hits 0mph. That's not going to happen with street tires though.

Bottom line is this. If you want to shorten stopping distances and actually "improve" your brake performance in this particular metric, then you'll need to upgrade your tires. Tires are the single most important factor of a cars handling and braking. They are the only part that actually touches the road. Something to think about.

2. Hawk makes good stuff. I personally don't like EBC brake pads, though there are those that do. Carbotech is another good option. Stoptech street performance pads usually get good reviews as well though the one time I tried them on a previous car, I was not impressed and felt they lacked bite.
If you are sensitive to noise and dust, then the Hawk HPS are ok pads. The Hawk HP Plus are better alternatives and are a pretty aggressive street pad. They will likely make a bit of noise, and they will dust up your wheels. The most important part of any pad install is to properly bed-in the pads. I usually do 3 stops from 30-5mph, 3 stops from 45-5mph, and 3 stops from 60-10mph. Do not come to a complete stop and if possible drive for 10 minutes afterwords without applying the brakes excessively until the system cools. Higher performance pads may need more stops from 60mph due to their higher temperature tolerance. Bedding in the pads applys a layer of pad material on the rotor. Improves the pads bite and reduces noise.

3. On a modern brake system using modern brake compounds, there is NO benefit from using cross-drilled rotors. They serve no purpose other then to look good. They remove material from the rotor which reduces its weight and in turn reduces its thermal capacity. They are prone to cracking, and in severe cases downright disintegrating in use. On a street car they are fine if you like the look, but if you take your car to a road course, they are a potential safety hazard. Just Google cross drilled rotor cracking and look at the pictures, no thanks.

As for slotted rotors, they serve little purpose with modern pad compounds. They do not degrade performance necessarily, and you will often see racing teams utilize slotted rotors (though not all). There are a couple marginal advantages that I do not see benefiting a street car and don't justify the price increase vs a solid rotor. Perhaps the biggest of which and most relevant is the ability to clean the pad surface, and for providing an area for debris that may contaminate the rotor surface to go. However cars stop just fine with standard blank rotors, and slots will not shorten stopping distances. They could also potentially introduce noise into the system.

The most important feature of any rotor is its overall construction. Quality iron being used and a vent system that either uses the OE vein structure or improves upon it. The internal vein structure of the rotor will do more to impact cooling performance then any other variable.

If budget isn't a factor, then slotted rotors are fine. They look cool on a street car, and yes...that is an important variable. Slot direction makes no difference...I'm just going to answer this question before it comes up. Rotors are directional based upon the internal vent structure. Which way the slots rotate makes no difference what so ever.

4. Your brake system is a hydraulic system that operates at substantial pressure. Stainless steel brake lines reduce the expansion of the brake line under hard use. Go into your car, and press the brake pedal as hard as you can. It will feel a little squishy on your average road car. That squishy feeling is a result of several factors, which include but not limited to: Brake line expansion, firewall deflection at the master cylinder, the brake pads themselves compressing, and the brake calipers flexing.

The biggest culprit is the brake lines. Standard brake lines are rubber based, and they will expand when you apply the brakes due to the pressure of the brake fluid in the system. This expansion results in a mushy brake pedal, which can make it hard to modulate the brakes during threshold braking and in severe cases can remove driver confidence. There is nothing more inspiring then a firm responsive brake pedal. Stainless steel lines will help firm up the brake pedal, making it easier to modulate the brakes. They will also improve the drivers perception of the brake system, because less pedal will need to be used to achieve the same braking performance.

A higher performance brake pad will also offer reduced compression. If the pad compresses less, then the brake pedal will feel firmer still.

Lastly those who go with a big brake kit will usually enjoy multi-piston fixed calipers which are usually stiffer then floating caliper designs. The factory Brembo package offers a 4 piston fixed caliper. Though this caliper is actually two pieces bolted together. Real racing quality Brembo calipers will be forged from a single piece of metal, which makes them stiffer still then the two piece calipers. However these single piece calipers are $$$. In terms of stiffness it goes two piece, single piece cast, and single piece forged. All of which get progressively more expensive, but at that point you are into the realm of diminishing returns.

Another key component is good ole Dot 4 fluid that is fresh. On a daily driven car, yearly flushes are fine. for a car that is tracked, then flush before each track day (and after each track day if daily driving will continue).
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Old 09-04-2014, 07:48 AM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeyM91 View Post
Don't know what to tell you. Mine worked out great, could be you didn't break them in properly, poor install, etc.

Sent from my SM-G900V using Mustang Evolution mobile app

I did a lubed install, bedded per instructions, and everything. Semi insulting to be honest when you tell a mechanic he did a poor install.

But I warped the rotors trying to stop from hitting the lady, so back to ford oem it is. Just be wary guys, my brakes would fade and have an odd pressure, but ok bite


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Old 09-04-2014, 07:53 AM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bazinga11 View Post
Now this definitely has left me speechless. I couldn't believe how misguided I was when it came to brakes, thanks a million for taking your time and educating everyone including me who has read/is going to read this thread. Definitely worth an eye opener.

I had stock michelins on my car, upgraded to perrelli, stopped worst and then even used powerstop brakes and pads like you see on AM. Got them off a different site, $240 all corners. The feel was never as good or the same again. Perrellis are a lot stickier especially filled with air rather than nitrogen. Big brakes help big bite, drilled rotors are ok BUT you have to figure out how they are made. Many are just blanks and are literally drilled. What are on vettes, Mercedes, and other high end automobiles are made through a mold and are much stronger and the correct way. If anything get slotted rotors and a very good pad. If you use a street/track pad, they will dust but you will stop. They also squeal when cold, give it ten minutes of driving and you're good. I'm speaking out of experience as my reference. And I'll preach, don't cheap out on brakes. You're gonna have a bad time.


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Old 09-04-2014, 07:55 AM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadCon View Post
1. I am talking different levels of grip. All factors such as tire width, tread pattern, compound, and diameter influence this variable. Purely speaking, I'm talking about a tires performance category. A max performance summer tire is going to offer more "grip" in ideal conditions then an all-season tire.

On a car with 225 series all season tires, you are not going to shorten stopping distances by installing a "Big Brake Kit." Your deceleration rate is limited by the traction provided by the tires, and not the clamping force of the calipers on the rotors. So for a single stop from 60mph to 0, your stopping distances will be identical whether you are using the "standard" brakes, or an upgraded big brake kit.

Now, if we reach the thermal limit of the standard brakes by employing multiple stops at high speed, THAT is when a big brake kit is needed. Another alternative is to simply upgrade the thermal capacity of the standard system by using higher performance brake pads, better fluid, etc. However there are limits and eventually you'll need to go with a big brake kit. But for a street driven car, or even one which see's an autocross track, this shouldn't be necessary if cost is a factor. By that I mean, a big brake kit is NEVER a bad thing, but the stock system can also be upgraded and shouldn't be overlooked if budget is a factor.

Not to make this anymore confusing, but if we replace that 225 series all-season tire with something like a 300 series racing slick, you will reach the limits of the stock brake system much sooner simply because the tires offer more traction.
Theoretically, there is a point where you would need a big brake kit even with a single stop from 60mph...that is because the tires offer so much grip that extreme temperatures can be generated on a single stop, which would result in brake fade before the car hits 0mph. That's not going to happen with street tires though.

Bottom line is this. If you want to shorten stopping distances and actually "improve" your brake performance in this particular metric, then you'll need to upgrade your tires. Tires are the single most important factor of a cars handling and braking. They are the only part that actually touches the road. Something to think about.

2. Hawk makes good stuff. I personally don't like EBC brake pads, though there are those that do. Carbotech is another good option. Stoptech street performance pads usually get good reviews as well though the one time I tried them on a previous car, I was not impressed and felt they lacked bite.
If you are sensitive to noise and dust, then the Hawk HPS are ok pads. The Hawk HP Plus are better alternatives and are a pretty aggressive street pad. They will likely make a bit of noise, and they will dust up your wheels. The most important part of any pad install is to properly bed-in the pads. I usually do 3 stops from 30-5mph, 3 stops from 45-5mph, and 3 stops from 60-10mph. Do not come to a complete stop and if possible drive for 10 minutes afterwords without applying the brakes excessively until the system cools. Higher performance pads may need more stops from 60mph due to their higher temperature tolerance. Bedding in the pads applys a layer of pad material on the rotor. Improves the pads bite and reduces noise.

3. On a modern brake system using modern brake compounds, there is NO benefit from using cross-drilled rotors. They serve no purpose other then to look good. They remove material from the rotor which reduces its weight and in turn reduces its thermal capacity. They are prone to cracking, and in severe cases downright disintegrating in use. On a street car they are fine if you like the look, but if you take your car to a road course, they are a potential safety hazard. Just Google cross drilled rotor cracking and look at the pictures, no thanks.

As for slotted rotors, they serve little purpose with modern pad compounds. They do not degrade performance necessarily, and you will often see racing teams utilize slotted rotors (though not all). There are a couple marginal advantages that I do not see benefiting a street car and don't justify the price increase vs a solid rotor. Perhaps the biggest of which and most relevant is the ability to clean the pad surface, and for providing an area for debris that may contaminate the rotor surface to go. However cars stop just fine with standard blank rotors, and slots will not shorten stopping distances. They could also potentially introduce noise into the system.

The most important feature of any rotor is its overall construction. Quality iron being used and a vent system that either uses the OE vein structure or improves upon it. The internal vein structure of the rotor will do more to impact cooling performance then any other variable.

If budget isn't a factor, then slotted rotors are fine. They look cool on a street car, and yes...that is an important variable. Slot direction makes no difference...I'm just going to answer this question before it comes up. Rotors are directional based upon the internal vent structure. Which way the slots rotate makes no difference what so ever.

4. Your brake system is a hydraulic system that operates at substantial pressure. Stainless steel brake lines reduce the expansion of the brake line under hard use. Go into your car, and press the brake pedal as hard as you can. It will feel a little squishy on your average road car. That squishy feeling is a result of several factors, which include but not limited to: Brake line expansion, firewall deflection at the master cylinder, the brake pads themselves compressing, and the brake calipers flexing.

The biggest culprit is the brake lines. Standard brake lines are rubber based, and they will expand when you apply the brakes due to the pressure of the brake fluid in the system. This expansion results in a mushy brake pedal, which can make it hard to modulate the brakes during threshold braking and in severe cases can remove driver confidence. There is nothing more inspiring then a firm responsive brake pedal. Stainless steel lines will help firm up the brake pedal, making it easier to modulate the brakes. They will also improve the drivers perception of the brake system, because less pedal will need to be used to achieve the same braking performance.

A higher performance brake pad will also offer reduced compression. If the pad compresses less, then the brake pedal will feel firmer still.

Lastly those who go with a big brake kit will usually enjoy multi-piston fixed calipers which are usually stiffer then floating caliper designs. The factory Brembo package offers a 4 piston fixed caliper. Though this caliper is actually two pieces bolted together. Real racing quality Brembo calipers will be forged from a single piece of metal, which makes them stiffer still then the two piece calipers. However these single piece calipers are $$$. In terms of stiffness it goes two piece, single piece cast, and single piece forged. All of which get progressively more expensive, but at that point you are into the realm of diminishing returns.

Another key component is good ole Dot 4 fluid that is fresh. On a daily driven car, yearly flushes are fine. for a car that is tracked, then flush before each track day (and after each track day if daily driving will continue).

Another point, I changed brakes and tires, less bite, less grip and these are freaking air filled Perrellis so they get sticky.

Car still handles the same as far as turns, jouce, and rebound. Tires do affect your brakes but tires aren't, well, brakes.


The original... Boss 227!

---------- Post added at 07:55 AM ---------- Previous post was at 07:55 AM ----------

Quote:
Originally Posted by BadCon View Post
1. I am talking different levels of grip. All factors such as tire width, tread pattern, compound, and diameter influence this variable. Purely speaking, I'm talking about a tires performance category. A max performance summer tire is going to offer more "grip" in ideal conditions then an all-season tire.

On a car with 225 series all season tires, you are not going to shorten stopping distances by installing a "Big Brake Kit." Your deceleration rate is limited by the traction provided by the tires, and not the clamping force of the calipers on the rotors. So for a single stop from 60mph to 0, your stopping distances will be identical whether you are using the "standard" brakes, or an upgraded big brake kit.

Now, if we reach the thermal limit of the standard brakes by employing multiple stops at high speed, THAT is when a big brake kit is needed. Another alternative is to simply upgrade the thermal capacity of the standard system by using higher performance brake pads, better fluid, etc. However there are limits and eventually you'll need to go with a big brake kit. But for a street driven car, or even one which see's an autocross track, this shouldn't be necessary if cost is a factor. By that I mean, a big brake kit is NEVER a bad thing, but the stock system can also be upgraded and shouldn't be overlooked if budget is a factor.

Not to make this anymore confusing, but if we replace that 225 series all-season tire with something like a 300 series racing slick, you will reach the limits of the stock brake system much sooner simply because the tires offer more traction.
Theoretically, there is a point where you would need a big brake kit even with a single stop from 60mph...that is because the tires offer so much grip that extreme temperatures can be generated on a single stop, which would result in brake fade before the car hits 0mph. That's not going to happen with street tires though.

Bottom line is this. If you want to shorten stopping distances and actually "improve" your brake performance in this particular metric, then you'll need to upgrade your tires. Tires are the single most important factor of a cars handling and braking. They are the only part that actually touches the road. Something to think about.

2. Hawk makes good stuff. I personally don't like EBC brake pads, though there are those that do. Carbotech is another good option. Stoptech street performance pads usually get good reviews as well though the one time I tried them on a previous car, I was not impressed and felt they lacked bite.
If you are sensitive to noise and dust, then the Hawk HPS are ok pads. The Hawk HP Plus are better alternatives and are a pretty aggressive street pad. They will likely make a bit of noise, and they will dust up your wheels. The most important part of any pad install is to properly bed-in the pads. I usually do 3 stops from 30-5mph, 3 stops from 45-5mph, and 3 stops from 60-10mph. Do not come to a complete stop and if possible drive for 10 minutes afterwords without applying the brakes excessively until the system cools. Higher performance pads may need more stops from 60mph due to their higher temperature tolerance. Bedding in the pads applys a layer of pad material on the rotor. Improves the pads bite and reduces noise.

3. On a modern brake system using modern brake compounds, there is NO benefit from using cross-drilled rotors. They serve no purpose other then to look good. They remove material from the rotor which reduces its weight and in turn reduces its thermal capacity. They are prone to cracking, and in severe cases downright disintegrating in use. On a street car they are fine if you like the look, but if you take your car to a road course, they are a potential safety hazard. Just Google cross drilled rotor cracking and look at the pictures, no thanks.

As for slotted rotors, they serve little purpose with modern pad compounds. They do not degrade performance necessarily, and you will often see racing teams utilize slotted rotors (though not all). There are a couple marginal advantages that I do not see benefiting a street car and don't justify the price increase vs a solid rotor. Perhaps the biggest of which and most relevant is the ability to clean the pad surface, and for providing an area for debris that may contaminate the rotor surface to go. However cars stop just fine with standard blank rotors, and slots will not shorten stopping distances. They could also potentially introduce noise into the system.

The most important feature of any rotor is its overall construction. Quality iron being used and a vent system that either uses the OE vein structure or improves upon it. The internal vein structure of the rotor will do more to impact cooling performance then any other variable.

If budget isn't a factor, then slotted rotors are fine. They look cool on a street car, and yes...that is an important variable. Slot direction makes no difference...I'm just going to answer this question before it comes up. Rotors are directional based upon the internal vent structure. Which way the slots rotate makes no difference what so ever.

4. Your brake system is a hydraulic system that operates at substantial pressure. Stainless steel brake lines reduce the expansion of the brake line under hard use. Go into your car, and press the brake pedal as hard as you can. It will feel a little squishy on your average road car. That squishy feeling is a result of several factors, which include but not limited to: Brake line expansion, firewall deflection at the master cylinder, the brake pads themselves compressing, and the brake calipers flexing.

The biggest culprit is the brake lines. Standard brake lines are rubber based, and they will expand when you apply the brakes due to the pressure of the brake fluid in the system. This expansion results in a mushy brake pedal, which can make it hard to modulate the brakes during threshold braking and in severe cases can remove driver confidence. There is nothing more inspiring then a firm responsive brake pedal. Stainless steel lines will help firm up the brake pedal, making it easier to modulate the brakes. They will also improve the drivers perception of the brake system, because less pedal will need to be used to achieve the same braking performance.

A higher performance brake pad will also offer reduced compression. If the pad compresses less, then the brake pedal will feel firmer still.

Lastly those who go with a big brake kit will usually enjoy multi-piston fixed calipers which are usually stiffer then floating caliper designs. The factory Brembo package offers a 4 piston fixed caliper. Though this caliper is actually two pieces bolted together. Real racing quality Brembo calipers will be forged from a single piece of metal, which makes them stiffer still then the two piece calipers. However these single piece calipers are $$$. In terms of stiffness it goes two piece, single piece cast, and single piece forged. All of which get progressively more expensive, but at that point you are into the realm of diminishing returns.

Another key component is good ole Dot 4 fluid that is fresh. On a daily driven car, yearly flushes are fine. for a car that is tracked, then flush before each track day (and after each track day if daily driving will continue).

Another point, I changed brakes and tires, less bite, less grip and these are freaking air filled Perrellis so they get sticky.

Car still handles the same as far as turns, jouce, and rebound. Tires do affect your brakes but tires aren't, well, brakes.


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Old 09-04-2014, 04:30 PM   #41
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Originally Posted by Whitelightning View Post
I had stock michelins on my car, upgraded to perrelli, stopped worst and then even used powerstop brakes and pads like you see on AM. Got them off a different site, $240 all corners. The feel was never as good or the same again. Perrellis are a lot stickier especially filled with air rather than nitrogen. Big brakes help big bite, drilled rotors are ok BUT you have to figure out how they are made. Many are just blanks and are literally drilled. What are on vettes, Mercedes, and other high end automobiles are made through a mold and are much stronger and the correct way. If anything get slotted rotors and a very good pad. If you use a street/track pad, they will dust but you will stop. They also squeal when cold, give it ten minutes of driving and you're good. I'm speaking out of experience as my reference. And I'll preach, don't cheap out on brakes. You're gonna have a bad time.


The original... Boss 227!
I second that, my car seems more responsive on my winter tires.. As comprised to Pirellis. Weird!!

My rotors have already been machined (more than a year ago). I'm looking for a complete brake set so that I can swap everything all at once.

Here's my dilemma: my car has performance package -I heard it came with upgraded brakes. Is it only GT rotors, or other components are different as well when compared to a normal V6?

Web sites I'm looking my brakes at have these options (different sites) in their drop down menu: v6 with standard brakes, v6 with non performance brake upgrades, GT brakes.

Which one do I go with?!

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Old 09-04-2014, 06:40 PM   #42
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You have the GT rotors (calipers are already the same) and "performance pads." If you want, measure your rotors to compare, stock GT units are 13.2"
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Old 09-04-2014, 06:48 PM   #43
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Oh okay. So I guess I'd have to chose standard GT brakes (non brembo option) from the drop down, or can I also go with standard V6 brakes since calipers are already the same?

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You have the GT rotors (calipers are already the same) and "performance pads." If you want, measure your rotors to compare, stock GT units are 13.2"
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Old 09-04-2014, 08:36 PM   #44
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AS far as pads are concerned, they are identical, as far as rotors are concerned you will be using the GT options. Again, this is my understanding, i would still measure your rotors (if you are in the market for them) to confirm.
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Old 09-04-2014, 08:52 PM   #45
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AS far as pads are concerned, they are identical, as far as rotors are concerned you will be using the GT options. Again, this is my understanding, i would still measure your rotors (if you are in the market for them) to confirm.
Sounds good, I shall do that.

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Old 09-04-2014, 09:05 PM   #46
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AS far as pads are concerned, they are identical, as far as rotors are concerned you will be using the GT options. Again, this is my understanding, i would still measure your rotors (if you are in the market for them) to confirm.
Aite so I'm on summit and I'm looking at a few centric blanks. It says outer diameter 11.811 inch. Under applications, I see it's compatible with both v6, and v8. Umm I'm confused here lol I even chose ford 5.0/boss 302 from vehicle selection panel. Don't our sixers have different rotors than the GTs?

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Old 09-04-2014, 09:06 PM   #47
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Sounds like the rear brakes
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Old 09-04-2014, 09:14 PM   #48
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You just beat me to it lol I was going to edit my previous post since I figured rear rotors are same in mustangs.

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Sounds like the rear brakes
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Old 09-04-2014, 09:16 PM   #49
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Same in everything except the GT500.
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Old 09-04-2014, 10:19 PM   #50
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Well I have custom built my brake system.. pheww this shiet is $$$ lol not too many options available for 13.22 in rotors out there. I'm wondering if it's worth replacing stock rotors with blanks?!

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Old 09-04-2014, 10:33 PM   #51
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I got Brembo take offs for 400$ if you can find em for cheap jump on em
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Old 09-04-2014, 11:28 PM   #52
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I got Brembo take offs for 400$ if you can find em for cheap jump on em
My problem is my winter wheels they're 17in and I don't think they will be able to clear brembos. Don't wanna spent another 1.5k on new set of tires n wheels lol

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Old 09-05-2014, 12:24 AM   #53
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My problem is my winter wheels they're 17in and I don't think they will be able to clear brembos. Don't wanna spent another 1.5k on new set of tires n wheels lol

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Old 09-06-2014, 12:14 PM   #54
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So I have narrowed down my choice of front rotors to EBC Ultimax Slotted Rotors ($154/pair), Centric Blank Premium Rotors ($165/pair), and StopTech Slotted Brake Rotors ($200/pair). To go with Hawk Performance ceramic brake pads.

1) Which one would you suggest? I know BadCon was suggesting that the price difference between blanks and slotted could be spent on better break pad, but in this case, good quality blanks are right on par with slotted ones. Plus, I am going to be driving in a city where it rains for majority of winter (October - March).

For rear, I am going to stick with stock rotors. One of my friends upgraded to bigger brakes, his stock ones are practically new and I will be buying those from him. Good idea?

2) For EBC rotors, it says 13.3in (337.82 mm) diameter. While a standard GT/performance package rotor is 13.228 in (336mm). Even though the difference is not that big, am I going to have to major fitment issues if I go with EBC? I am also downsizing to 17' winter wheels in winter, from my current 19' summer tires. I don't have any clearance issues so far. Would it be any different now?

Thanks a lot guys
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Old 09-06-2014, 09:55 PM   #55
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So I have narrowed down my choice of front rotors to EBC Ultimax Slotted Rotors ($154/pair), Centric Blank Premium Rotors ($165/pair), and StopTech Slotted Brake Rotors ($200/pair). To go with Hawk Performance ceramic brake pads.

1) Which one would you suggest? I know BadCon was suggesting that the price difference between blanks and slotted could be spent on better break pad, but in this case, good quality blanks are right on par with slotted ones. Plus, I am going to be driving in a city where it rains for majority of winter (October - March).

For rear, I am going to stick with stock rotors. One of my friends upgraded to bigger brakes, his stock ones are practically new and I will be buying those from him. Good idea?

2) For EBC rotors, it says 13.3in (337.82 mm) diameter. While a standard GT/performance package rotor is 13.228 in (336mm). Even though the difference is not that big, am I going to have to major fitment issues if I go with EBC? I am also downsizing to 17' winter wheels in winter, from my current 19' summer tires. I don't have any clearance issues so far. Would it be any different now?

Thanks a lot guys
I ran EBC rotors on my focus back in the day and they were very high quality. That was awhile ago though, and things may have changed. My default recommendation is Centric Premium Blanks, however for the price difference (marginal), any of the three should serve you well. In all honesty, nothing wrong with a slotted rotor. Most of my previous posts have to do with the actual benefit they provide vs. the cost, but in this case I'd say do it, if for no other reason then they would look "cool." If that doesn't matter to you then pick whatever.

If EBC claims they fit the Mustang, then they probably do. Not sure why they would list a size that's out of spec.

As for the rear brakes, why are you buying someone elses stockers when you already have the same stuff on your car? Do you just need new rotors?

As for the Hawk ceramic pad, its going to be a slight upgrade from stock, but its not a true performance pad. Its a good daily driving pad however, and should serve a street car well and keep the wheels clean. Just don't go doing any track days on them .

I was going to make some direct recommendations on pad compounds, but crossover street/race pads never really work all that well. So just get a good street pad and if you ever get into auto crossing or tracking the car, get a true "race" pad and a second set of rotors and call it a day.

However Hawk recently released a couple new compounds. The Hawk Performance Street 5.0 pad is new, and I guess is replacing the original HPS. I haven't heard anything about it. There is also the new Hawk Performance Street/Race pad which I guess is a new version of the HP +. I'm assuming by putting 5.0 in the label, they are targeting Mustang owners directly. I wish I could offer more insight, but details are hard to come by.

I hope the upgrade works out for you!
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Old 09-07-2014, 01:12 AM   #56
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I have heard nothing but good things about EBC, hence why I am semi partial towards these among the three I chose. You are right about benefit vs cost factor and if the difference was lets more than $70-100/pair, centric blanks would have been my default choice anyway.

I have checked Summit for applications of these EBC rotors, and I do see our mustangs listed there. Lets hope they I fit without any issues.

I am considering another set of stock rotors just for the peace of mind for having everything brand new for my brake system, to be honest. My rotors have already been machined (over an year ago, I had glazing problem). Idk if that would effect longevity of my current rotors, given that I have driven a bit? A pair of centric blanks for the rear is around $100. Would these be any better than stock rotors? Like should I just stick to what I have right now than getting another set of new stock rotors? I am just confused in my head..too many options lol

I live in North America's worst congested city, where more than half of the roads don't have a separate left turn lane. And when I say that, I mean there will be whack jobs tryna cut you off and merge in your lane.. or slam their brakes from nowhere. Same thing even on a hwy. And there are way too many people driving foreign driving license. This is the reason I am upgrading my brakes, in case I have to deal with a panic stop.

What pad recommendations were you going to make? I checked for Hawks you have mentioned, I believe they're mostly targeted for strip use and/are kinda harsh on rotors + noise and all such goodies that come with it. My car is going to be 100% street driven, with spirited driving here and there. What are your views regarding EBC's Red Stuff pads though?

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I ran EBC rotors on my focus back in the day and they were very high quality. That was awhile ago though, and things may have changed. My default recommendation is Centric Premium Blanks, however for the price difference (marginal), any of the three should serve you well. In all honesty, nothing wrong with a slotted rotor. Most of my previous posts have to do with the actual benefit they provide vs. the cost, but in this case I'd say do it, if for no other reason then they would look "cool." If that doesn't matter to you then pick whatever.

If EBC claims they fit the Mustang, then they probably do. Not sure why they would list a size that's out of spec.

As for the rear brakes, why are you buying someone elses stockers when you already have the same stuff on your car? Do you just need new rotors?

As for the Hawk ceramic pad, its going to be a slight upgrade from stock, but its not a true performance pad. Its a good daily driving pad however, and should serve a street car well and keep the wheels clean. Just don't go doing any track days on them .

I was going to make some direct recommendations on pad compounds, but crossover street/race pads never really work all that well. So just get a good street pad and if you ever get into auto crossing or tracking the car, get a true "race" pad and a second set of rotors and call it a day.

However Hawk recently released a couple new compounds. The Hawk Performance Street 5.0 pad is new, and I guess is replacing the original HPS. I haven't heard anything about it. There is also the new Hawk Performance Street/Race pad which I guess is a new version of the HP +. I'm assuming by putting 5.0 in the label, they are targeting Mustang owners directly. I wish I could offer more insight, but details are hard to come by.

I hope the upgrade works out for you!
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Old 09-07-2014, 02:05 AM   #57
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What pad recommendations were you going to make?
I lost site of your initial goals. In this instance, any street performance pad with good reputation would do.
Stoptech Street performance
Hawk HPS 5.0 (the new formula)
Carbotech 1521
Ferodo DS2500

All should offer a substantial improvement in bite over the stock pads. The new Hawk HPS 5.0 looks really interesting the more I read about it. CJ Pony Parts stocks them. The Ferodo's are more aggressive then the others, but livable on the street and rotor friendly. Your choice of the Hawk Performance Ceramic was fine in its own right. Should offer a bit more bite then stock, but not as aggressive as the above. Note, that all these pads are going to dust up your wheels, though shouldn't make much noise on the street if bedded in properly.
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Old 09-07-2014, 07:40 AM   #58
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I changed mine to GT500s that I got from ebay last year. Here's the comparison for V6 PP vs GT500 (both 2013). I never experienced brake fade so far even when I exchange it with low quality pads due to excessive dust. But then again, mine is a street use and never seen a track yet.

Front
Click image for larger version

Name:	ImageUploadedByMustang Evolution1410092991.435496.jpg
Views:	127
Size:	1.18 MB
ID:	165382

Rear (calipers are the same. Just the size of the rotor and bracket is different)
Click image for larger version

Name:	ImageUploadedByMustang Evolution1410093311.796094.jpg
Views:	124
Size:	1.19 MB
ID:	165383

It was a jackpot from ebay. So far the best deal I had since infected with mod bug.
Click image for larger version

Name:	ImageUploadedByMustang Evolution1410093421.132124.jpg
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Old 09-07-2014, 04:03 PM   #59
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Thanks BadCon, you've been of great help throughout this thread! I think I will go with hawk HPS 5.0 mainly because of the price point. Autoanything has them, but carbotech or feredo. I have their discount count, so I will just buy it from them.

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I lost site of your initial goals. In this instance, any street performance pad with good reputation would do.
Stoptech Street performance
Hawk HPS 5.0 (the new formula)
Carbotech 1521
Ferodo DS2500

All should offer a substantial improvement in bite over the stock pads. The new Hawk HPS 5.0 looks really interesting the more I read about it. CJ Pony Parts stocks them. The Ferodo's are more aggressive then the others, but livable on the street and rotor friendly. Your choice of the Hawk Performance Ceramic was fine in its own right. Should offer a bit more bite then stock, but not as aggressive as the above. Note, that all these pads are going to dust up your wheels, though shouldn't make much noise on the street if bedded in properly.


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Old 09-07-2014, 04:07 PM   #60
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Man id pounce on take off brembos if i lived in Cali/somewhere it doesn't get too cold in winters. I have to swap my current 19' summer tires for 17' Michelin x ice 3s before November, and brembos are going to create some serious wheel clearance issues. And I'm not in mood to spend another 1.5k for new tires loll

But thanks though, you got an hell of a deal!!

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Originally Posted by Tangster View Post
I changed mine to GT500s that I got from ebay last year. Here's the comparison for V6 PP vs GT500 (both 2013). I never experienced brake fade so far even when I exchange it with low quality pads due to excessive dust. But then again, mine is a street use and never seen a track yet.

Front
Attachment 165382

Rear (calipers are the same. Just the size of the rotor and bracket is different)
Attachment 165383

It was a jackpot from ebay. So far the best deal I had since infected with mod bug.
Attachment 165384


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Old 09-07-2014, 05:20 PM   #61
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The base v6 brakes are soo bad.. trying to come to a semi short stop from anything over 80 is scary and makes my whole car start to shake/ make weird grinding noises.
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Old 09-07-2014, 09:32 PM   #62
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The base v6 brakes are soo bad.. trying to come to a semi short stop from anything over 80 is scary and makes my whole car start to shake/ make weird grinding noises.
Spot on Mikey. Never mind 80, I have replicated that experience from 50 countless number of times. I have ended up in middle of an intersection tryna stop from 50-55 because of a yellow light. It felt as if I was braking in foot high water puddle.

As bad it might sound, my 10 year old work van has better brakes. Much more sensitive.

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Old 09-07-2014, 11:09 PM   #63
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The base v6 brakes are soo bad.. trying to come to a semi short stop from anything over 80 is scary and makes my whole car start to shake/ make weird grinding noises.
Funny, I have the factory brakes in my 3.7 and amazing, the car slows down, even comes to a complete stop when I press on the brake pedal. No issue with my factory brakes.

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Old 09-07-2014, 11:12 PM   #64
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You should put pads, rotors and new steel brake lines all at the same time. If your short on money, buy what you can and wait until you have enough money to install them all as the same time.

---------- Post added at 12:12 AM ---------- Previous post was at 12:11 AM ----------

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Funny, I have the factory brakes in my 3.7 and amazing, the car slows down, even comes to a complete stop when I press on the brake pedal. No issue with my factory brakes.

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That's because you drive your up and down the driveway only.
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Old 09-07-2014, 11:15 PM   #65
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Brake upgrade for better stopping power: just pads or full kit?

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Man id pounce on take off brembos if i lived in Cali/somewhere it doesn't get too cold in winters. I have to swap my current 19' summer tires for 17' Michelin x ice 3s before November, and brembos are going to create some serious wheel clearance issues. And I'm not in mood to spend another 1.5k for new tires loll

But thanks though, you got an hell of a deal!!





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No need to spend for a new wheels. I ran GT500 brakes with PP wheels. All you need is to change 2.75" to 3" wheel stud and minimum 1/2" spacer. I ran this for almost a year 'til my rear tire got damaged by a pot hole. I upgraded to a better fit wheel after the mishap.
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Old 09-08-2014, 02:52 AM   #66
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Thats the plan. I am getting Russel's stainless steel brake lines off ebay for about $75, to go with new rotors, pads, and high performance dot 4 fluid. I am hoping this would spice things up a bit.

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You should put pads, rotors and new steel brake lines all at the same time. If your short on money, buy what you can and wait until you have enough money to install them all as the same time.

---------- Post added at 12:12 AM ---------- Previous post was at 12:11 AM ----------



That's because you drive your up and down the driveway only.
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Old 09-08-2014, 02:55 AM   #67
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I am sure 19' PP package wheels would clear brembos without any hiccup as you suggested. The problem is going to be with my 17' winter wheels that 'just' clear GT rotors.


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No need to spend for a new wheels. I ran GT500 brakes with PP wheels. All you need is to change 2.75" to 3" wheel stud and minimum 1/2" spacer. I ran this for almost a year 'til my rear tire got damaged by a pot hole. I upgraded to a better fit wheel after the mishap.
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Old 09-08-2014, 02:58 AM   #68
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Bro coming to a halt is not a problem, I am sure your car will slow down and even come to a stop with rotors half the size of what our sixers come with from factory. Key is how soon.

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Funny, I have the factory brakes in my 3.7 and amazing, the car slows down, even comes to a complete stop when I press on the brake pedal. No issue with my factory brakes.

Sent from my naked Johnson. The third real non Boss 227
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Old 09-08-2014, 05:45 AM   #69
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You should put pads, rotors and new steel brake lines all at the same time. If your short on money, buy what you can and wait until you have enough money to install them all as the same time.

---------- Post added at 12:12 AM ---------- Previous post was at 12:11 AM ----------



That's because you drive your up and down the driveway only.
Ba ha ha ha ha. Stops on a dime in the driveway. Lol

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Old 09-08-2014, 08:27 AM   #70
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I am sure 19' PP package wheels would clear brembos without any hiccup as you suggested. The problem is going to be with my 17' winter wheels that 'just' clear GT rotors.

PP wheels will clear the circumference but not the offset.
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