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Old 04-01-2013, 08:16 AM   #1
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To change or not to change?

My current 2013 Mustang GT is my first garage queen. I bought it in October, put 250 miles on it and then put it away for the winter. I read somewhere that you should change the oil after storing a car for the winter. Is that true, even though I only have 250 miles on the car? And is there anything else I should do before I bring it out this spring?

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Old 04-01-2013, 08:23 AM   #2
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It's always a good idea because you can get moisture in the crank case during storage.
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Old 04-01-2013, 09:13 AM   #3
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yea I would it's always a good idea after one has set especially through season change
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Old 04-01-2013, 01:43 PM   #4
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Next time you store it for 2 or more months, ad some sta-bul fuel additive to the tank. With the higher percentages of ethanol being used today, the gas can break down much faster than it did years ago. Keeps your gas tank from getting rusted or varnished, which can end up in the injuectors and clogging them.
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Old 04-01-2013, 02:49 PM   #5
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Next time you store it for 2 or more months, ad some sta-bul fuel additive to the tank. With the higher percentages of ethanol being used today, the gas can break down much faster than it did years ago. Keeps your gas tank from getting rusted or varnished, which can end up in the injuectors and clogging them.
I wouldn't put that chit in my lawn mower. Starting the car once a month is plenty good. I tried it once and the car smoked like a turd til it was gone.
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Old 04-02-2013, 09:44 AM   #6
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The oils manufactured today have anti-oxidants which dissipitate in 6 months, whether you store the car or use it, so changing the oil is recommended. On the fuel storage, use Sea Foam, I use it in the backhoe, dumptruck, boats, quads, motorcycles, and the other cars/trucks that I own. It keeps the system clean as well as preserves the fuel and prevents water issues. You can also use Sea Foam in the crankcase/transmission. I use it in diesel and gasoline systems and have never had a bad experience. If you are going to park the vehicle for an extended time, you might explore running the fuel system dry.
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Old 04-02-2013, 04:14 PM   #7
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It's actually better to change the oil before you put it away before base oxidation sets in. Then in the Spring when you get it out just take it on a long ride to get the oil good and hot.
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Old 04-02-2013, 04:19 PM   #8
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It's actually better to change the oil before you put it away before base oxidation sets in. Then in the Spring when you get it out just take it on a long ride to get the oil good and hot.
Totaly disagree, metals sweat do to the warm and cold cycles.
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Old 04-02-2013, 04:54 PM   #9
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Totaly disagree, metals sweat do to the warm and cold cycles.
You can disagree all you want but you would be wrong. There's a reason all manufacturers of all engines say to change the oil before you store it away. It's called base oxidation.
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Old 04-02-2013, 05:08 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by Grabber Blue5.0
You can disagree all you want but you would be wrong. There's a reason all manufacturers of all engines say to change the oil before you store it away. It's called base oxidation.
Would you care to elaborate, I've never heard of base oxidation. Also like to know where I can find the manufactures recommendations saying that.
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Old 04-02-2013, 05:26 PM   #11
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What I mean is look at the manufacturer of an engine, any engine and they'll tell you to change the oil before storage. Like a mower or snow blower. Now you can say that's different than a automobile motor. But it isn't. The old oil has lots of contaminants in it that will cause this which is the reason you want to get it out before storage.
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Old 04-03-2013, 10:13 AM   #12
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The comment that metals sweat is not really accurate. There is no inherent moisture in the metal. What is commonly referred to as "sweat" is actually condenstation which occurs when a metal is colder that the ambient air, causing the moisture to collect on the cold metal and then pool in the bottom of the oil pan, similar to an iced drink sitting on a table. The changing of oil will not prevent this. The only thing that can be truthfully stated is that all metals will experience oxidation when exposed to air. The oils produced today have additives which inhibit this from happening. But the inhibitive properties dissipitate over time, typically 6 months. So firstly, change the oil, secondly, run the engine now and then to get the moisture inside the engine to a temperature high enough to allow the moisture to evaporate, this is why engines have a pcv valve (as well as to burn off the oil vapor). Hope this helps the conversation.
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Old 04-03-2013, 10:55 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by mtnman325
The comment that metals sweat is not really accurate. There is no inherent moisture in the metal. What is commonly referred to as "sweat" is actually condenstation which occurs when a metal is colder that the ambient air, causing the moisture to collect on the cold metal and then pool in the bottom of the oil pan, similar to an iced drink sitting on a table. The changing of oil will not prevent this. The only thing that can be truthfully stated is that all metals will experience oxidation when exposed to air. The oils produced today have additives which inhibit this from happening. But the inhibitive properties dissipitate over time, typically 6 months. So firstly, change the oil, secondly, run the engine now and then to get the moisture inside the engine to a temperature high enough to allow the moisture to evaporate, this is why engines have a pcv valve (as well as to burn off the oil vapor). Hope this helps the conversation.
I was putting it on laymans terms. Moisture forms on anything cold when the air temp is warmer. Change the oil, don't change it, idc. I've rebuilt over a hundred Harley motors, so I do have an idea what moisture in the oil looks like inside a motor, grease.
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Old 04-03-2013, 11:20 AM   #14
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Yeppers.
Worst one I had was a ruptured exhaust manifold on a boat, 30 miles from shore, puking chocolate shake into the bilge from the dipstick tube and filler cap. That was serious moisture.
Totally agree with you!
Gotta love these new Stangs!
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