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Old 02-26-2014, 10:12 PM   #1
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After market hood problems????

So I just recently sold my stock hood and bought a truefiber venom hood from American muscle. I've talked to some professional auto body shops on quotes for the painting of the hood. Prices are ok. But they all have had concerns with painting the hood since it's fiberglass. So I googled it, there are some real horror stories of paint jobs on the web with all them same typical problems. They will be doing all prep and paint work. But I've read that the hood needs to sit outside In the sun for a few days before taking it to the paint shop.
So does anyone have any experience dealing with aftermarket hoods and getting them painted? I do not want this to end in a nightmare.
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Old 02-26-2014, 10:24 PM   #2
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If a body shop knows how to paint the hood they should know these steps...

STEP 1: Slow bake the hood for approximately 3 hours up to 130 degrees. This process is to ensure that the hood is fully cured and also to release any
air pockets in the fiberglass. Any fiberglass hoods that are not fully cured can have adverse affect such warppage and solvent popping.
STEP 2: Take a dual action sander using 150 grit sand paper to sand down the gel coat surface of the hood, prepare the gel coat for a sandable primer,
make sure you get it all sanded. Before applying the primer apply epoxy sealer to seal pinholes and possible stress cracks.
STEP 3: Now using fiberglass body filler such as “evercoat" to fix the low spots and/or bubbles that you know will be visible after it’s painted. It is
necessary to pop the bubbles to apply the body filler. You can avoid using body filler to cover the low points. If you choose not to use the body filler
then you will need to spray more primer where there are low points. Before the surface is primed, mark the hood areas where low spots are located by
circling them with a greaseless pencil. This way when you prime it you know which areas require more primer.
STEP 4: Prime the entire hood with a sandable polyester primer. We recommend minimum of 2-3 coats of primer. This will allow for adequate build
up then “guide coat” the entire surface for the purposes of showing the texture. Like low and high spots of the primer, guide coating is typically applied
with a spray can of black lacquer paint, it will not look too pretty but it works.
STEP 5: Now after that it’s all done and dry, the primer surface must be wet sanded with a rigid block to keep the surface smooth. 220 grit wet or dry
can be used for the first cut, we would recommend wet... after the entire surface has been cut with 220, it can be re-guide coated and then hand sanded
with 400 or 500 grit paper. Be sure to use mild pressure, too much force can actually put waves into the fresh surface.
STEP 6: Now with the hood completely sanded, hang it where there's no dirt or particles, better yet a painting booth.
STEP 7: Now the hood is ready for painting process…Remember, the key to a good paint job on a fiberglass product is the prep work!
*NOTE: These steps have been performed and proven to work very effectively by a fiberglass specialist. Contact us if you have any question. Stress
cracks / gel coat cracks are considered normal for fiberglass. It’s up to the specialist to prep the hood properly quality show finished.
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Old 02-27-2014, 04:46 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jsmorley81 View Post
So I just recently sold my stock hood and bought a truefiber venom hood from American muscle. I've talked to some professional auto body shops on quotes for the painting of the hood. Prices are ok. But they all have had concerns with painting the hood since it's fiberglass. So I googled it, there are some real horror stories of paint jobs on the web with all them same typical problems. They will be doing all prep and paint work. But I've read that the hood needs to sit outside In the sun for a few days before taking it to the paint shop.
So does anyone have any experience dealing with aftermarket hoods and getting them painted? I do not want this to end in a nightmare.
Jsmorley81,

Honestly, I would probably talk to a different shop to do the work. Reputable paint shops typically aren't worried about aftermarket fiberglass hoods. One particular shop that I've used in the past, paints almost only paints aftermarket body panels and aftermarket hoods. I've yet to see any poor work come out of their shop.

Moral of the story- I think it's all about experience. I would try and find a shop that paints aftermarket goods often. Otherwise, I'm sure you could run into the same risks you mentioned.

Shane
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Old 02-27-2014, 06:58 PM   #4
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Thanks for the info. What about hood pins? Do you have to have them?
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Old 02-28-2014, 12:51 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jsmorley81 View Post
So I just recently sold my stock hood and bought a truefiber venom hood from American muscle. I've talked to some professional auto body shops on quotes for the painting of the hood. Prices are ok. But they all have had concerns with painting the hood since it's fiberglass. So I googled it, there are some real horror stories of paint jobs on the web with all them same typical problems. They will be doing all prep and paint work. But I've read that the hood needs to sit outside In the sun for a few days before taking it to the paint shop.
So does anyone have any experience dealing with aftermarket hoods and getting them painted? I do not want this to end in a nightmare.

Dang I would have sold you my cervini stalker 2 hood I just bought and had painted and then 2 weeks later took off my car to trade it in. Click image for larger version

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ID:	149225 if you know of any one let me know it's for sale
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Old 02-28-2014, 02:53 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jsmorley81 View Post
Thanks for the info. What about hood pins? Do you have to have them?
Hood pins are a nice safety feature and give a look sinister for any hood. However, they're not required. If you don't like the look of hood pins, then I wouldn't worry about using them. They truly aren't essential.

Let me know if you have any other questions!

Shane
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Old 02-28-2014, 03:40 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LuisBlackGT View Post
If a body shop knows how to paint the hood they should know these steps...

STEP 1: Slow bake the hood for approximately 3 hours up to 130 degrees. This process is to ensure that the hood is fully cured and also to release any
air pockets in the fiberglass. Any fiberglass hoods that are not fully cured can have adverse affect such warppage and solvent popping.
STEP 2: Take a dual action sander using 150 grit sand paper to sand down the gel coat surface of the hood, prepare the gel coat for a sandable primer,
make sure you get it all sanded. Before applying the primer apply epoxy sealer to seal pinholes and possible stress cracks.
STEP 3: Now using fiberglass body filler such as “evercoat" to fix the low spots and/or bubbles that you know will be visible after it’s painted. It is
necessary to pop the bubbles to apply the body filler. You can avoid using body filler to cover the low points. If you choose not to use the body filler
then you will need to spray more primer where there are low points. Before the surface is primed, mark the hood areas where low spots are located by
circling them with a greaseless pencil. This way when you prime it you know which areas require more primer.
STEP 4: Prime the entire hood with a sandable polyester primer. We recommend minimum of 2-3 coats of primer. This will allow for adequate build
up then “guide coat” the entire surface for the purposes of showing the texture. Like low and high spots of the primer, guide coating is typically applied
with a spray can of black lacquer paint, it will not look too pretty but it works.
STEP 5: Now after that it’s all done and dry, the primer surface must be wet sanded with a rigid block to keep the surface smooth. 220 grit wet or dry
can be used for the first cut, we would recommend wet... after the entire surface has been cut with 220, it can be re-guide coated and then hand sanded
with 400 or 500 grit paper. Be sure to use mild pressure, too much force can actually put waves into the fresh surface.
STEP 6: Now with the hood completely sanded, hang it where there's no dirt or particles, better yet a painting booth.
STEP 7: Now the hood is ready for painting process…Remember, the key to a good paint job on a fiberglass product is the prep work!
*NOTE: These steps have been performed and proven to work very effectively by a fiberglass specialist. Contact us if you have any question. Stress
cracks / gel coat cracks are considered normal for fiberglass. It’s up to the specialist to prep the hood properly quality show finished.
If no one else will thank this man then I will. Great information and I'm really glad someone else takes the time out to know what they're talking about with paint and body and actually strive for show quality finishes.. None of the cheap and fast bull****. Kudos, sir.
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Old 03-01-2014, 04:01 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by luisblackgt View Post
if a body shop knows how to paint the hood they should know these steps...

Step 1: Slow bake the hood for approximately 3 hours up to 130 degrees. This process is to ensure that the hood is fully cured and also to release any
air pockets in the fiberglass. Any fiberglass hoods that are not fully cured can have adverse affect such warppage and solvent popping.
Step 2: Take a dual action sander using 150 grit sand paper to sand down the gel coat surface of the hood, prepare the gel coat for a sandable primer,
make sure you get it all sanded. Before applying the primer apply epoxy sealer to seal pinholes and possible stress cracks.
Step 3: Now using fiberglass body filler such as “evercoat" to fix the low spots and/or bubbles that you know will be visible after it’s painted. It is
necessary to pop the bubbles to apply the body filler. You can avoid using body filler to cover the low points. If you choose not to use the body filler
then you will need to spray more primer where there are low points. Before the surface is primed, mark the hood areas where low spots are located by
circling them with a greaseless pencil. This way when you prime it you know which areas require more primer.
Step 4: Prime the entire hood with a sandable polyester primer. We recommend minimum of 2-3 coats of primer. This will allow for adequate build
up then “guide coat” the entire surface for the purposes of showing the texture. Like low and high spots of the primer, guide coating is typically applied
with a spray can of black lacquer paint, it will not look too pretty but it works.
Step 5: Now after that it’s all done and dry, the primer surface must be wet sanded with a rigid block to keep the surface smooth. 220 grit wet or dry
can be used for the first cut, we would recommend wet... After the entire surface has been cut with 220, it can be re-guide coated and then hand sanded
with 400 or 500 grit paper. Be sure to use mild pressure, too much force can actually put waves into the fresh surface.
Step 6: Now with the hood completely sanded, hang it where there's no dirt or particles, better yet a painting booth.
Step 7: Now the hood is ready for painting process…remember, the key to a good paint job on a fiberglass product is the prep work!
*note: These steps have been performed and proven to work very effectively by a fiberglass specialist. Contact us if you have any question. Stress
cracks / gel coat cracks are considered normal for fiberglass. It’s up to the specialist to prep the hood properly quality show finished.
excellent information.
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