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Old 02-08-2014, 02:24 AM   #1
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So I am trying to learn how to drag race one day. But I dont know when will be the best to shift. I figured 6k rpm is probably the peak hp point. Or should I redline it?
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Old 02-08-2014, 03:30 AM   #2
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I would suggest shifting a few 100 rpm before redline. My buddy was getting his best runs when doing this. Besides, I don't see hitting redline every time being very healthy for your car.
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Old 02-08-2014, 03:59 AM   #3
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I have never been to a track in my life but I would say you probably shift where you peak power is. If you run it above that, you are just wasting time and losing power. There are plenty of racers on here that will know, that's just what I think would be right.
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Old 02-08-2014, 01:32 PM   #4
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Run it out to red line! It's ALL about figuring out how to get off the line . Get good launch and 60 ft it's all down hill from there. Don't worry about reaction time just focus on leaving the hole without spinning thru the gears. Getting the car to hook is the hardest part.
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Old 02-08-2014, 06:11 PM   #5
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Yes, going to redline may be above peak power/torque, but the benefit is that once in the new gear you will be higher up the hp/tq curve. Shift as high as you can without bumping the fuel cuttoff!
Have fun!
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Old 02-09-2014, 09:56 AM   #6
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Shifting totally depends on where your car makes power.

Some cars can rev well past their hp peak and still maintain power, others just fall flat on their face.

For example, an older stock 5.0 Fox makes peak torque at 3200 rpm and peak power at 4000 rpm. Redline is at 5900 rpm. Running one of these cars to redline for each shift will be a bit slower than someone "short shifting" the same car at say 5000 rpm. The person short shifting the car will likely be a few tenths faster than the person running the car to redline.

That is simply because those cars don't breathe on the top end and loose a significant amount of power (50+hp and 100+ ft lbs) compared to the same car that short shifts.

The new Coyote 5.0 for example, has no need to short shift because the power has not dropped off by it's factory rpm limit.

You basically want to keep your car in it's power band. That would be between it's peak torque rpm and it's peak hp. In between the two points is where your car will produce the most power, thus acceleration. Shifting way past your peak power like with the 5.0 Fox, will only result in a much slower car as each shift will put you within just a few hundred rpm of your peak power (around 3800 - 4000 rpm) and then the power will start falling off. Whereas shifting at 5000 rpm will keep you in meat of the power band around 3400 - 3600 rpm and provide more acceleration.

Like I mentioned earlier, some cars can over rev and still maintain power, others will fall flat on their face. Typically, newer cars are much better at maintaining power over rpm than older cars.
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Old 02-10-2014, 12:06 PM   #7
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I shift @ 6900 in my 2012. I hit the fuel shut off once due to the POS shifter but that's racing. Got my attention! Don't worry about the shifting rpm. Try 6000 for a while till you have some consistant runs down. Focus on getting a good RT under .150 and 60' (2.1 or less). Leave about 3000 on the last yellow and nail it, shift at 6000 and have fun! Stock you should be around 14.70 about 98 mph at this shift rpm. Everyone out there is always learning. Have fun.
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Old 02-10-2014, 12:14 PM   #8
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Best thing to do is find out where your car makes power and if it can maintain it past peak power.... Time to go find a dyno.
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Old 02-10-2014, 12:21 PM   #9
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dam i hate that they closed the dyno where i live
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Old 02-11-2014, 12:48 AM   #10
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There's a little bit of math to this, but it's not too bad. First thing you need is to figure out where you make the most power. This is where you're going to have the highest rate of acceleration. So once you've gotten your dyno numbers, you can look at your curve and figure out where you want to keep your engine running for as long as possible.

Let's use a made up example to make this easier. Let's say your car makes peak power at 5200 RPM, the torque peak in this fictitious example is 4800 RPM, and your redline is 7200.

Here's where the math comes in. You need to understand not only what RPM your engine is making now, but what RPM you're going to be at when you shift to the next gear. For this you need to know your gear ratios. Let's use the ratios of a Tremec 3650 from a 2010 GT. 1st gear is 3.38:1, 2nd 2.00:1, 3rd 1.32:1, 4th 1.00:1, 5th 0.68:1. We'll say you have 3.73 gears installed in this.

You'd end up shifting the first two gears at redline because your torque peak is low enough that shifting from first to second and second to third will still put you above the start of your torque peak. After that, you would shift around 6300 RPM, then at about 7000.

This is what would work best for these specific numbers, so you need to know your own horsepower/torque numbers and your gear ratios to plan it out for your specific application
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Old 02-18-2014, 01:10 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shuvool View Post
There's a little bit of math to this, but it's not too bad. First thing you need is to figure out where you make the most power. This is where you're going to have the highest rate of acceleration. So once you've gotten your dyno numbers, you can look at your curve and figure out where you want to keep your engine running for as long as possible.

Let's use a made up example to make this easier. Let's say your car makes peak power at 5200 RPM, the torque peak in this fictitious example is 4800 RPM, and your redline is 7200.

Here's where the math comes in. You need to understand not only what RPM your engine is making now, but what RPM you're going to be at when you shift to the next gear. For this you need to know your gear ratios. Let's use the ratios of a Tremec 3650 from a 2010 GT. 1st gear is 3.38:1, 2nd 2.00:1, 3rd 1.32:1, 4th 1.00:1, 5th 0.68:1. We'll say you have 3.73 gears installed in this.

You'd end up shifting the first two gears at redline because your torque peak is low enough that shifting from first to second and second to third will still put you above the start of your torque peak. After that, you would shift around 6300 RPM, then at about 7000.

This is what would work best for these specific numbers, so you need to know your own horsepower/torque numbers and your gear ratios to plan it out for your specific application
Good explanation
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