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Old 02-03-2015, 04:44 AM   #1
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Sticky for Common/popular Mustang mods

We are placing topics and replies in this sticky to the most commonly asked questions we see on this forum pertaining to Mustang modifications. This sticky can be used to allow any member to direct a thread that asks a question that is covered within this sticky.

Your help is greatly appretiated; if you have a suggestion/submission you'd like to see added to this sticky, please PM any moderator; they can copy your details into this sticky.

Here are the topics (please check from time to time; this list will increase as we add submissions to it):

1) CAI

2) Throttle body?

3) Headers

4) Midpipes

5) Gears

6) Tuners

7) Lower Control arms

8) Upper control arm

9) Adjustable panhard bar

10) Sway bars

11) Strut bars

12) Brakes

13) 2.73 to 3.73 Gear swap
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Old 02-03-2015, 05:07 AM   #2
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CAI

Thanks to member Voltwings for this submission

Ford has actually done a pretty decent job with the factory intake, so for most practical purposes your aftermarket CAI will serve two purposes: Sound, and bling. This will be true on about 75% of the cars out there, but there will be cases where more airflow will allow more power.
The reason the aftermarket "No Tune Required" intakes do not require a tune, is because the MAF (Mass Air Flow) sensor diameter is the same as stock. The MAF calculates how much air is being brought into the engine and adds fuel accordingly. NOTE: if you do change to an air intake with a larger MAF diameter, YOU MUST have your car tuned for it or you will run dangerously lean, no if's, ands or buts about it.
So, the argument here is that an intake that is larger than stock will have a higher flow potential, and could possibly bring in more air than an otherwise stock sized intake could.
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Old 02-03-2015, 05:08 AM   #3
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Headers

Thanks to member Voltwings for this submission

The general consensus here (as well as in the 5.0 forums, where i spend most of my time) is that Long tubes will net you higher peak gains, and shorties will give more low end and mid range grunt.

Longtubes: Long tubes will require a tune. One, because you are deleting the cats, but two, because of the way headers flow. The technology in these Ti-vct motors is incredible, and they basically allow you to tune the car to optimize virtually any set up at any rpm. Here is an article on understanding tuned length headers, and how the Ti-vct system allows us to maximize these gas pulses, but also why the tune is incredibly important to making power.
Let's get technical. The biggest controversy in header design is the "equal length" versus "shorty" styles - which is best?

As far as the rest of your exhaust, you will need a mid pipe that is designed especially for long tubes. This is very important when planning your exhaust mods, a mid pipe that works with stock headers WILL NOT work with long tubes.

Shorties: Whether a tune is "needed" with shorties or not is another highly debated topic. Seeing as how the runners lengths are still "tuned," i believe the cam timing can be optimized to match, therefore i would suggest a tune. However, the changes are a little less drastic than longtubes, so you likely can get by without a tune for some time.
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Old 02-03-2015, 05:09 AM   #4
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Midpipes

Thanks to member Voltwings for this submission

The Factory mid pipe is a Hybrid H/X pipe with 2 cats, and 2 resonators. Your aftermarket mid pipes will come in 1 of 2 configurations, either a dedicated X or H, with the option of cats or no cats typically.

X-pipe: It has been dyno tested that an X will make more power, however marginal it may be (typically 3-5 whp at best). Typically however, your X-pipe will induce a LOT more rasp, something someone may want to keep in mind when choosing their mods.

H-pipe: Again, as was said above the H-pipe will give up a few whp to the X-pipes, but the lack of rasp may be a little more what some folks are looking for.

Cats Vs Catless: Depending on how strict inspections are in your area, you may want to choose an aftermarket mid pipe option that includes High flow cats. High flow cats are an interesting topic, and one that is also highly debated, but i will include my personal opinion. The only reason cats are "high-flow" is because of the number of cells they have, the fewer the cells, the "higher flowing" it is. Well, if a cat flows enough, it can still register (as far as the computer is concerned) as "catless" and cause issues with emissions testing. Just food for thought. Personally, i would either go catless or stick with the factory pipe. I personally dont see the point in spending $500+ on a mid pipe that still has cats, but this is a decision you will have to make for yourself.
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Old 02-03-2015, 05:09 AM   #5
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Gears

Thanks to member Voltwings for this submission

Gears will basically change how your car reacts in its powerband. A longer gear (smaller number) will mean longer gears or more time in gear, whereas a shorter gear (higher numbers) will move through a gear much more quickly. There is a balance, people get hung up on the fact that the car is "revving faster" with a higher gear (4.10 ...) but that does not mean the car is going faster. A higher gear will mean more acceleration, but there is a point of diminishing returns as far as overall acceleration and speed is concerned.

Your typical "all around best gears" are going to be anything in the 3s, 3.31 - 3.55 - 3.73, and your more extreme, really 1/4 centered gears will be anything in the 4s, 4.10 - 4.56 ...
This changes the more power you have however, a 3.73 may be a very well rounded gear for a lightly modified car, but a boosted 3.7 making 400-450 whp will certainly want a longer gear, something more along the lines of a 3.31 or 3.55. The more power you have, the less gear you really need (or in fact, want) because you want to let your car pull through the more powerful powerband.
The factory gear is a 2.73, which is a LONG gear designed for one purpose: gas mileage, and this brings us to our next point. As you move to a gear designed more for acceleration, it means you will impact your gas mileage as well. Typically a gear that is more acceleration oriented will actually improve city mileage (if you can keep your foot out of it) while decreasing hwy mileage. There is a LOT of information on this forum regarding gears, this thread is not the place to discuss that. A good way to easily find information is using the "google search" technique. Simply type your question and forum name into google: "3.7 mustang best auto gear mustangevolution," or "2011 v6 mustang auto 3.55 mustangevolution," and it will pull up threads on this forum. You may have to experiment with your wording, but the information is out there, and it is plentiful.
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Old 02-03-2015, 05:11 AM   #6
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Tuners

Thanks to member Voltwings for this submission

The tuner is likely going to be the best bang for your buck on your modern engine, allowing your car to optimize either its factory components or aftermarket parts you have added.
A tune consists of a handheld device that you can load tunes on, that can then be loaded onto the vehicle. This handheld is also your means of datalogging your car, for either your own understanding or for sending logs to your tuner for reviewing. NOTE* virtually all hand held devices, save for the very newest models, will require a laptop for datalogging. It is important you have a firm understanding of the software, and the PIDS your tuner wants logged for a successful tuning experience.

What a tune does: In a nutshell, the tune is the recipe for success. Think of your car as a cake so to speak... you can have the best parts (ingredients), but if you have a poor recipe, you will have a poor cake... The tune basically adjusts (or can adjust) every single performance aspect of the car so that everything works in harmony for the best combination of performance, driveability, mpg.
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Old 02-03-2015, 05:12 AM   #7
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Lower control arms (and brackets)

Thanks to member Voltwings for this submission

I believe there is a lot of debate regarding lower control arms and brackets. If your car is lowered... at all... regardless of how small of a drop, you need lower control arm brackets to correct the suspension geometry. People say their car gets by fine, and drives fine, and you dont "need" them, but i disagree 100%. The car WILL NOT load the rear axle properly without relocation brackets (if the car has been lowered), and the car will suffer during launches and shifts.
Upgraded lower control arms come in a few variations, poly bushing vs spherical, fixed vs adjustable... i will leave you do do your own research in regards to those, but i will just cover their general purpose: which is to put load on the axle.
Your lower control arms are anchored on one end on the body, and at the other end on the axle. When you accelerate and the car shifts weight to the rear, it transferees the weight onto the rear axle and improves traction. The stock LCAs have a very soft rubber that tends to deflect during hard driving, and upgraded LCAs will improve the weight transfer.
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Old 02-03-2015, 05:13 AM   #8
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Upper control arm (and bracket)

Thanks to member Voltwings for this submission

This part is critical for correcting pinion angle. This is important when a car is both A. Lowered, and B. has a one piece driveshaft. It is very commonly known that an aftermarket UCA will cause a "clunking" noise when used with the stock bracket, so it is highly recommended to upgrade both at the same time.
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Old 02-03-2015, 05:14 AM   #9
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Adjustable Panhard Bar

Thanks to member Voltwings for this submission

This is another critical piece to upgrade when the car has been lowered. One end of the PHB is anchored on the body, and the other on the axle. When the car is lowered, it will cause the body to shift in relation to the axle, so it is very important to have an adjustable panhard bar to re-center the body over the axle.
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Old 02-03-2015, 05:15 AM   #10
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Sway bars

Thanks to member Voltwings for this submission

I believe there is a lot of confusion understanding the point of a sway bar, it is not simply to "reduce body roll." The point of a sway bar is to adjust grip independently between the front and rear, depending on whether your car is "pushing" or "pulling" in corners. This is a part 90% of street cars will not need, but is not something i will not spend the time explaining, i'll allow this article to. This is just another one of those mods you will need to do research for your specific goals and needs.
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Old 02-03-2015, 05:16 AM   #11
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Strut bars

Thanks to member Voltwings for this submission

Again, another part that is supposed to reduce body roll. There are some that will work really well, and some that i believe are all fluff ... this thread is not really meant to be the time or place for that, just another mod you will have to research for your goals and needs.
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Old 02-03-2015, 05:16 AM   #12
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Brakes

Thanks to member Voltwings for this submission

Big brake kits do not mean more stopping power. Again, big brake kits DO NOT mean more stopping power. The point of a "Big Brake Kit" is for higher heat retention, and a fixed caliper + more pistons for more even pad wear on a road course. All a street car, or even mild track car, needs is a decent set of pads and rotors. For example, i run a set of Carbotech XP10 (more of a track pad, not really recommended for street use), and just a set of centric premium rotors on my GT (non brembo) and i can kick the abs on at about 75% braking with 295 nitto NT05s on all 4 corners. What this means is i still have WAY more brakes than i do tire. If you want better stopping power, what you need is good tires. Tires + a good set of pads + a good set of rotors, in that order, is the recipe for better stopping.

Drilled and/or slotted rotors. These are a gimmick, they look damn cool, but will offer 0 performance benefit over a premium blank rotor. Drilled rotors crack, period, it is not a matter of If, but when. Drilled rotors means less thermal mass to absorb heat, and less surface area for the pad to provide clamping force, they are a waste of money, and not beneficial in any way other than cosmetics. Slotted rotors are somewhat the same, really you're just paying for looks, and they do look cool, but just keep that in mind when shopping for brakes.
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Old 03-23-2015, 01:18 PM   #13
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2.73 to 3.73 Gear change

Thanks to member kgallowaypa for this submission


Hey guys so I finally did my gear swap today at Steeda Autosports in Pompano Beach Florida and instead of just posting a massive paragraph of my experience, I decided to do a Frequently Asked Questions review to this swap. I pulled some of the most asked questions regarding gears and gave my own "opinion and experience" based answers on the transition from stock 2.73 gears to 3.73, the most popular gear swap for our cars. Its a bit lengthy in total, but I hope this is helpful to anyone in the South/Mid Florida area on the fence about doing the swap @ Steeda in Pompano Beach FL, and to the community in general, how the transition to 2.73 to 3.73 is for me on a manual transmission cyclone.

Q: How much did Steeda charge you? [TJ if you can chime in on this one]
A: Initial quote was $550 for the swap on a 2014 Mustang V6 Manual transmission at 6200 miles on the odometer when I brought it in. Before the swap, I bought my SCT X4 from MPT and requested in the form to load on the 3.73 ratio on my 3 custom tunes in order to have everything 'plug and play' on the day I arrived to Steeda for the swap. No point in asking for a 2.73 ratio when I already knew I was doing the swap. I first contacted Steeda via live chat on their website and spoke to Rod, very friendly and knowledgeable. I put down a $150 deposit to reserve the shop time a week before the install and prepared the order. A week later (Today/Friday) When I arrived and the pricing was discussed, Don gave me a discount for a differential housing part that I requested to be added on but it was not necessary to the install, so my cost came out to $650 out the door, but without the differential housing kit, $550 for a 3.73 swap is pretty accurate, maybe even lower if Steeda has a sort of Mustang Evolution discount if they can be sent more business from this referral and the 4 other people in my area ready to bite the bullet on this one. Keep in mind my mustang is a 14 with 6200 miles, if you have a mustang with some more mileage, parts could change and the price might creep up a little bit. On the invoice, the most expensive segment was the labor, which came out to $350 for a standard 4 hours of time. So although you might pay a little north of $550 if you have a high mileage cyclone or older SN197, the labor should be the same, depending on what your car has or might need for a rebuild kit.

Q: What was the turnaround time?
A: I got into the shop at 1:15pm and had my car swapped to 3.73 ready and finished at 4:40pm so almost 4 hours; 4 hours was my quoted time for labor and they managed to shrink it down to 3 hours 25 minutes. The cost for labor is negligible, as long as it was done right, I wouldn't whine about 35 minutes of labor overtime paid, plus the discount I got on the housing, any 'attitude' on invoice labor would be ridiculous.

Q: How was the install (waiting) experience overall?
A: Awesome, the guys at Steeda treat you like family; a very chill environment and a TON of mustang specific magazines to sift through if your not the mobile phone type of person. In the 3 hours I spent there, I learned a lot from the employees about mustangs in general and and and a lot of interesting Stang's pulled in. There was a nice 15 gt being worked on which turned out to be one of the manager's own cars testing out a tune. The consensus around the office was that the 15 mustang GT's are a ***** to work on but Steeda was trying to remain competitive against BAMA and MPT to get a stable tune on the 15 models. Some eye candy rolled in as well - a 2003 cobra came in, and I believe one of the employees had a nice 2008 GT, very impressive. Overall, the wait to get the gears done was 'cozy' great vibe there and easy to kill 3-4 hours waiting on the install to finish. I was able to hang out in the sales area and talked to a few employees who know a lot about our cars (obviously) and I can say I was confident they could handle the gear swap with no problem.

Q: What ratio did you get? What did you have before?
A: I had the stock 2.73 ratio and switched to the 3.73 ratio as per Don @ Steeda's recommendation. I asked him if on a manual transmission that might be a little too short a ratio for a daily driver, but he said its the most popular swap they do and even for a manual, he recommended 3.73. 1st gear is still useable even on daily driving but you will shift a lot more. You have the option of starting in either 1st or 2nd gear, with 2nd gear being a smooth transition from a stop and 1st begin about a 1-2 second pull to redline depending on other mods.

Q: Was a tune required?
A: Yes, I brought in my SCT X4 tuner, with 3 custom tunes from MPT Performance preloaded with the 3.73 axle ratio on all 3 tunes. Steeda specifically mentions to bring your tuner the day of the install. I wouldn't know what they would say if you didn't have your tuner with you, but I would recommend getting the tuner first as a mod install, then gears or CAI at your discretion and budget. My logic is that if you have the shop doing the gear swap and you have a tuner with custom tunes on it, you are pre quoted the labor for the mechanic to ensure the tune works correctly with the custom tunes at the time of the install. It would suck to have the gears installed first without a tune, then tune the car and realize you have a problem. Steeda also offers their own tunes so kill 2 birds with 1 stone and have the tuner preloaded with your 3.73 custom tune in the file before hand when you arrive at the shop so if any diagnosis needs to be done, its done by someone who knows what could be going on.

Q: What is your reaction starting up on 3.73's with a standard transmission?
A: Well you can actually start out in second gear now which is cool. Since your not used to the ratio, its very easy to over rev and begin chirping the tires hard even with traction fully on in 1st gear. 1st gear to me now acts as either a 'gun it from a stop' gear or '0-60 time' gear. For daily driving, 2nd gear now becomes your old first gear but if you are experienced with your MT82 transmission, you can still start off relatively smooth in 1st but its a quick shift to 2nd gear under normal circumstances. As far as cruising around and moderating gears based on whats going on while driving in traffic, I would say when I had the 2.73's and I wanted to rev match, if I was going 20MPH for example, I knew I could be in 3rd gear and the engine would be around 1.2-1.5k RPM's. So in my head I knew more or less the first number of the MPH I am going, just add a number up for that gear (10 mph, 2nd gear for smoothness, 20mph, 3rd gear, etc...) BUT with the 3.73's, its adding another number to make a smooth transition for daily driving. So if I was now going 10mph, I would go to 3rd gear for a smooth transition at 1.5k RPM's, 20mph would be 4th gear, and so on. What you find is that the wonderful MPG you have been getting ends once you go passed 40MPH because now your in the highest, 6th gear at 1.5k RPM's...but we don't get 3.73 for MPG Its for the "holy crap, the car is about to jump to 1987 in a matter of seconds" feeling. And man does it let you know it FAST. An interesting thing I noticed is that with the Steeda CAI I had on the car, the car moved so damn fast from a stop that combined with the sound of the CAI in front of you, it might convince you the car is running a turbo. Definitely the first 3 mods every v6 owner should get is a tune, CAI, and gears. Those 3 are just incredibly on how much it changes your car. I was skeptical on how much the car would actually be different, but believe me, you really feel like it has the torque of a grand sport. I know because Ive driven a 2014 grand sport plenty of times and that 'knock-back' feeling is very close to that sensation..Especially when the front end begins to rise at 5k RPM at 1st gear 0.0

Q: How has your Miles Per Gallon changed?
A: For the break in period I am keeping it under 60 MPH...but in 6th gear, 60 MPH on the highway, your getting a solid 2k RPM engine speed which really will make those MPG's dump. If your in a manual, you can play with the clutch on hills to make the most out of it if your really stingy, but your going to lose a lot of MPG on the highway or going a long distance over 50 MPH...no matter what...You can go up to 70 or 80 cruising which is around 2.5/2.6 RPM engine speed, but your just dumping fuel (93 octane at that, not cheap) to get somewhere 5 minutes sooner if this is just commuting miles.

Q: Is there a break-in period after the swap?
A: Surprisingly, the only mention of a break in was, quote - "Take is easy for the first 200 miles"...After reading extensively on other forums, and having to do the drive back from Pompano to Miami, a 1 hour drive, I knew a little bit about heat cycling the gears and for the first time I can ever say, I was so happy to hit rush-hour traffic (lol). Cruising to no more than 60 MPH at 6th gear let the wear pattern for 6th set in for the first 20 miles. When I hit my first traffic spike, I fiddled between keeping the car engaged in both 1st and 2nd gear for about 15 minutes. Here and there I would spurr to 4k RPM's and clutch in to cool off what I could in the rear differentials until traffic moved again. In my hour road trip back to Miami, I was able to use all gears from 1 through 6 and did not notice any gear whine or negligible effects from breaking in. When I arrived home, I let the car sit in the shade for an hour and drove again at cruising RPM shifting through all the gears to develop a similar pattern on the highway trip. On my invoice the gear fluid used was Ford's Motorcraft brand but at 500 miles I will be switching to Royal Purple to change out any metallic that might have formed in the break-in period. I know for some people this 'break in' idea of gears might not be necessary, but better safe than sorry and traffic for once in my life worked to my favor at rush-hour 5:00pm Miami time on a Friday

Q: You mentioned major chriping in 1st gear, any suggestions for an easy pull out?
A: After experience, I would say once the swap is complete, pull out of the shop in 2nd gear to a straight-line road and gun it. This will give you a fair estimate of the differences between your stock ratios versus your new setup. As mentioned before, you can pull out in 1st but expect to shift quickly to 2nd, it might be best to start in 2nd since the gear will actually push you to roll before you are close to stalling. As far as chirping and making noise at stops, start to appreciate you have 305 to the crank; gentle on the throttle and you can casually shift through the gears. Otherwise I would say start in 2nd if your nervous about drawing attention and just shift when you hit 2k RPM to the next gear.

Q: Is the reverse gear affected by the swap?
A: Yes but barely noticeable. Think about the same revs you used to do in 2.73's while reversing to keep the car from stalling and apply that to a 2nd gear on the old 2.73's; its difficult to make the car stall as the new gears will keep the car rolling in either direction - reverse feels almost the same as stock but there is no more need to blip throttle to keep the car from staling while you are pulling out.

Q: If I have an Automatic, should I get 3.73 or 4.10 gears?
A: I Cant speak for an automatic cyclone but if the gear transition is the same on the manuals (I heard that the automatic transmission changes at the most 'efficient' RPM) I would say 3.73 will be an excellent choice. 4.10 might be too aggressive for your daily driver but that is my speculation. I would read up on other threads about automatics and the 4.10 gear ratio before deciding on this swap if its your daily driver, but a 3.73 would be a great option.

Q: Will a 3.73 swap void my warranty? [Forum, please clarify/verify for accuracy]
A: The short answer is maybe...consider the fact that a licensed Ford dealership will only swap a gear up to a ratio of 3.33 to retain and honor the factory warranty on the 'differential'. By swapping to a 3.73 gear on the differential, your gear ratio will not be covered by Ford Warranty Claims if it had to call upon a contract warranty for repairs. But you already knew this didn't you... The problem and grey area is Steeda and affiliation Steeda has within Ford. This topic of warranty 'claim' denials and aftermarket parts is discussed ad-nauseum within this forum and its quirks and policy details are too lengthy to go into this topic within this thread. Short answer for that - A denial is based per dealership and records kept of your vehicle and its type of uses along with your insurance profile. However, when I asked Don, my lead service adviser at Steeda before beginning the install, he confirmed that Steeda will stand by their installation should the unexpected occur that is related to the swap itself (not talking about destroying your rear end on on a quarter mile because you just so happened to have a Steeda shop installed 3.73 gear ratio on your car at the 'time of loss')... IF something went wrong with the install and Steeda was at fault due to installation based on faulty/defective parts provided by the shop who installed them, Don assured me they would stand by their service and correct what might have gone wrong. Now although i don't doubt this, and the grey area between Roush, Steeda, and other licensed ford 3rd party manufactures for warranty is hazy, IF you have a differential problem that was solely based on the gear swap, Steeda would stand by their installation, assuming it was within a reasonable time to notice problems, if any, upon installation completion. BUT if you had a gear problem that ended up destroying the driveshaft or other factory OEM part due to an aftermarket installation not recognized as 'COVERED' under your power-train warranty certificate, then it gets very hazy and you should read about the magnusson-moss act. Of course this is the, 'what-if-warranty' dilemma we all see and at the end of the day, is up to who can cover the claim and blame fault; beyond the scope of this thread.

Q: Is a gear swap on stock 2.73 to 3.73 worth it?
A: If your on the fence about doing a swap because it might seem too expensive from other quoted shops, (I have seen threads about a $1000 quote at Ford to swap, with no warranty) I would say Bite the Bullet and Do It (but do it right). There are a plethora of threads on the performance increase and bang-for-the-buck mods for our cyclones and this mod is, in my opinion the #1 bang for the buck next to turbo/prochaging based on $$$ to feel of difference. However, I do understand that you have to do it right, because it can be expensive to do a swap, regret it, and then go back to another swap (Labor costs add up quick for correcting a buyer's remorse mistake).

My best advice before you think of purchasing a short gear swap: See if you have a friend (or someone here on mustangevolution in your area) that can show you what its like driving a 3.73 ratio before you take the plunge. It can be our cyclone engines or even an older 'new edge' 2002 gt; what you want to pay attention to (Manual transmission specifically) is your shifting pattern and how much you want to deal with on a daily driver..and I stress DAILY driver, this mean limiting highway driving - road trips are a financial no-no with this gear ratio due to fuel costs, and that 24/7 raw acceleration all the time on demand, anytime you need to go somewhere... As many people have said, it WILL wake that thing you call a V6 and it WILL put a smile on your face if you have stock ratios..but, keep in mind it can be aggressive at times and depending on your demeanor, this is a mod that once put on, can be hard to justify paying an additional $550 to swap out to a lower ratio if you think its too much. Overall I put my confidence with Steeda and so far at 130 miles in on the swap, will say that I am very satisfied with the professionalism and quality of work they did on the swap. besides...IF you chose to do a swap with another shop because maybe they are quoting you a bit less, its the confidence that the shop that is doing this major change is STEEDA...not 'Joe's Differential's LLC'

Hope you guys enjoyed this little review, if you have any other questions or live in the South Florida, Miami area, shoot me a PM and ill be glad to meet up with you and show you how the difference is. Got a bunch of ppl in Miami thinking about this so I guess ill be the guinea pig and say - DO IT!
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Old 08-30-2015, 04:56 PM   #14
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HOW TO: Changing Transmission Fluid on MT82 Manual Transmission

I have decided to do a write up for those who want to change out the crappy stock fluid.

Keep in mind, this is for a 14' V6 with the MT82 trans. There may be subtle differences between those with different years/models.
Also, this is the method that worked for me and I'm sure there are different ways to go about this, please don't be critical unless it's something of value. Thanks.

As for choosing the transmission fluid, this is completely preference but I decided to go with Royal Purple Synchromax. There are other options out there that some may prefer over the other, but this is all subjective.

Tools you will need:
Jack & Jack stands / Ramps (I had to use both due to the incline on my driveway)
8mm Allen Wrench (or 5/16)
Small Hammer
Paper clip (to check fluid level)
Multi-use fluid pump
Drain pan (or milk jug.. just make sure it can hold AT LEAST 3 quarts)
Towels/shop rags

Before changing fluid, make sure your trans is slightly warm for the fluid to flow easier. Go for a quick cruise around the block if needed.

Step 1:
Make sure you have your car on a level surface. If you have a lift, this will make the process a whole lot easier! If you have an inclined/declined driveway like I do, improvise with ramps/jackstands to level the car off. Once the car is up in the air and level, it should look something like this:


Step 2:
Once you have the car off of the ground, level, and properly supported by jackstands/ramps or a lift, Locate the transmission Fill plug and Drain plug. Ford was courteous and labeled which one is which. The Fill plug is located on the passenger side of the transmission. The Drain plug is located at the very bottom of the transmission. I have circled the FILL plug in RED and the DRAIN plug in BLUE:


Notice the plugs have been labeled:


Step 3:
Once you have located the plugs, it is time to remove them. Remove the FILL plug FIRST! You will need an 8mm allen wrench (I used a 5/16)


Once inserted the allen wrench into the plug, I used a hammer to tap it loose. No fluid will come out so don't worry about needing the drain pan. Once you have the FILL plug out, remove the DRAIN plug repeating the same process above by tapping it loose. You might have to give it a couple good whacks because it is on there pretty tight. Once the DRAIN plug is loose, get your drain pan ready! (I used a milk carton sized 1 gallon and cut the top off):



I waited about 15minutes for the fluid to drain completely just to be safe. The MT82 trans takes 2.7quarts of fluid so be sure that your drain pan/milk jug is larger than 3 quarts.

Once the fluid has completely drained, be sure to thread the drain plug back into the transmission. After I tightened the plug by hand, I used the hammer and gave the allen wrench a few good whacks to make sure it sealed properly.

Step 4:
This is where a pump will be useful. I found a hand pump at Home Depot for $9 made by Pennzoil in the auto section and it worked GREAT! Recommend using this product, or something similar:

Follow the instructions on the packaging to set up the pump and get ready to transfer the fluid. I've also seen people run a hose from the FILL hole into the interior of their car and fill it that way. I don't like this because you risk getting fluid in your car and it can get very messy. Which ever way you choose, good luck.

As mentioned above, the MT82 trans takes 2.7 quarts of fluid so be sure to pick up 3 quarts of your desired transmission fluid. Once your pump is set up, make sure the discharge hose is properly inserted into the transmission FILL hole. This took a little bit of force as the hose was very slightly larger than the opening. Make sure to insert the hose at least 2-3inches into the opening so none of the fluid spills out. Insert the intake hose into one of the bottles of desired fluid and start pumping!:



Be sure to go slow enough so that the discharge hose does not get pushed out of the FILL hole on the transmission. Also, once you start getting to the end of the bottle, make sure to support the bottle so it does not tip over. An extra set of hands would be helpful here, but it is not necessary.

Continue pumping until two of the three bottles have been successfully transferred into the transmission.

Step 5:
Once you have transferred 2 of the 3 bottles of fluid, you are going to need to take out .3 quarts of fluid from the last bottle.
Here is a break down to further understand how much .3 quarts is..
1 quart = 32 ounces
32 ounces divided by 10 (ten tenths in a whole) = 3.2
3.2 ounces = .1 quart
3.2 ounces x 3 = 9.6 ounces
9.6 ounces = .3 quarts

So, we have to remove roughly 9.6 ounces from the last quart of fluid. I made this very simple for those who are no good with math.. 1 cup = 8 ounces. I got a measuring cup (1 cup) from my kitchen and poured the bottle of fluid into the cup and filled it to the brim: This would then leave me with roughly 1.5ounces of extra fluid. The reason I did this is because there is some fluid that is left behind in the "empty" bottles as well as the left over fluid in the pump that did not make it to the transmission.

Pump the remaining .7 quarts into the transmission and then remove the discharge hose from the FILL hole and wipe off any fluid that drips on the housing.

Once the 2.7 quarts have been transferred, I used a paperclip and bent it in order to check the fluid because there is no way I'm getting my finger in there:

Make sure the fluid is about a half inch below the fill hole.

Reinstall the FILL plug into the transmission and tighten properly as mentioned previously by giving the allen wrench a few good whacks.

Double check to make sure the plugs are properly secured.

Step 6:
After double checking that the FILL plug and DRAIN plug are tight, properly remove the jack stands / ramps from under your car.

Start your Mustang and HEAR HER ROARRRR!!!

Before test driving, shift through all of the gears (reverse included) a couple times to be sure the fluid has been properly circulated.

I cruised mine for a bit and took it on the highway to bang all of the gears and make sure everything felt right.

I was impressed by the noticeable smoothness when shifting. Shifts feel a heck of a lot better than with the stock fluid. Seems to glide into gear a lot easier. Took me about an hour and a half from start to finish.

I am not responsible for any damage you may cause to yourself or your mustang.
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