how do people restore their rusty old mustangs? - Mustang Evolution

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Old 11-10-2014, 08:19 PM   #1
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how do people restore their rusty old mustangs?

for example I seen instances where people would buy like a rusted out old 66 mustang then when they are done it would look like a brand new off the factory mustang!

for rust holes and stuff do they patch it up and fill it with a new piece of metal? or try to find a replacement part online? from what i hear when you got rust you can really just buff it down then repaint it or replace the panel. I've seen a guys mustang where pretty much EVERYTHING under the hood was rusted, the bottom sides of the engine bay, etc...god it was awful...but then he restored it like brand new :S guess he had to take everything out of the engine bay then either repaint or replace all those side walls and stuff?

in my town there are a lot of 60s mustangs and you see them rolling along in the winter time too rocking snow tires...and it just amazes me how they have no rust :/
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Old 11-11-2014, 06:17 PM   #2
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I started like this. I have to get it in my garage so I can weld in the new floor pans and the quarter skin. I have a rotisserie to put it on so I can get the bottom and all done correctly.

68 coupe restore

As for the rust I clean it use a rust converter or cut it out and replace the part. Most panels are available for a small cost.
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Old 11-11-2014, 06:20 PM   #3
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That's how they do it.


2014 5.OHHHHHH
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Old 11-11-2014, 08:20 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mlarv5 View Post
I started like this. I have to get it in my garage so I can weld in the new floor pans and the quarter skin. I have a rotisserie to put it on so I can get the bottom and all done correctly.

68 coupe restore

As for the rust I clean it use a rust converter or cut it out and replace the part. Most panels are available for a small cost.
Cool that's pretty impressive! It's nice to see people take beat up old mustangs and turn them to like new condition. Encourages me to not worry about my cars future to know if something gets messed up that it is fixable.

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Old 11-12-2014, 06:00 AM   #5
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Attachment 169567

That's how they do it.


2014 5.OHHHHHH
^^ This ^^

And lots of it.

A good restoration shop manager once was asked how you tell if a vehicle is "fully restored". His answer was to open the door, stuff money into the cabin until no more would fit. Close the door; it's now restored.
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Old 11-12-2014, 06:08 AM   #6
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^^ This ^^

And lots of it.

A good restoration shop manager once was asked how you tell if a vehicle is "fully restored". His answer was to open the door, stuff money into the cabin until no more would fit. Close the door; it's now restored.
Lol, so does that mean its better to just buy a new mustang? the early s197 is my favorite of all time time atm and if something happens to mine I rather fix it than get another used one. but i guess if i cant afford it ill have to go towards an s550 - they look alright but i HATE the exhaust not on the s550....are they not Hpipe from the factory?
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Old 11-12-2014, 06:26 AM   #7
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Not at all! It's great to see interest for restoration. Car shows would be extremely boring if only late model new cars where shown.

Anyone can buy a new car, keep it in a garage, drive it on sunny days to shows and win trophies. To me, the person that has a true "driver" and uses it as such, and shows it, or someone who takes an older vehicle, does work to it (any level of restoration) and shows it, earns my respect.

It's just the level of the restoration that adds to the money equasion.

My father in law bought a 68 Torino GT to grab the 428 SCJ it had. He had this engine in a 76 Ford F150, and that engine was getting "tired" as he put it. My father in law used to race dirt track back in the 50's up in Wisconsin (to set the stage on my dad in law). Anyhow, he bought this Torino, and began to investigate the car. He found out that only 50 Torino's came from the Ford factory with a 428 SCJ engine; Caroll Shelby threatened Ford that he would pull his name (and plug) from the Shelby Mustang if Ford used the 428 SCJ in anything but the Mustang. Ford stopped the 428 SCJ Torino (replaced it with the 429), but 50 had been produced and sold.

So, dad in law spent the next 10 years restoring this Torino. I spent a lot of time helping, scowering junk yards collecting nuts and bolts, because even they had to be correct Ford issue for my dad in law. Car was completed in 2001. Unfortunately, both my mother in law and father in law died of cancer within a year of each other in 2002. Both were heavy smokers.

The sad part is the car got sold in the estate auction; I have no idea where it is. I think it's in North Carolina. I don't have the VIN to trace. And sadly, I have no pics of the car during or after it's frame up restoration.

It's a red 68 Torino GT 428 SCJ with factory A/C and smog air pump. Very rare, suposidly only 8 were known to still be in existance.
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Old 11-12-2014, 08:56 AM   #8
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I love old cars and have the greatest appreciation for a high quality restoration. Unfortunately, that is a labor of love in most cases as the amount invested usually exceeds the value of the car, unless it is a rare variant. I had a rusty old 68 S code convertible that sat in my garage for years serving no real purpose. I had planned to restore the car but once I got the point where I had the funds and time, I had lost interest in such a big project. I wound up buying a new GT that I could enjoy now, but my plan is to buy a 65-66 fastback in a few years. Only next time I'm buying one that is in good shape with little to no rust, or preferably one that has already been restored by someone else.
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Old 11-12-2014, 09:30 AM   #9
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Yeah I agree i think theres a point where ya gotta consider the cost of restoration vs the value of the car to you. Hoping with my s197 I can take good care of it and prevent any need for expensive restoration as the years roll on. However driving in the winter scares me cus of rust but I wash and vacuum weekly.
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Old 11-12-2014, 11:40 AM   #10
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it's cheaper and easier to buy one already restored, but, there is nothing wrong with doing it yourself for the love of cars.

I only wrote something I thought was semi-profound because several people beat me to the $$$$$$$$ answer
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