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-   -   Modify GT for track (http://www.mustangevolution.com/forum/f358/t376332/)

bobbydgo 04-24-2016 10:42 PM

Modify GT for track
 
Hey guys, many of you have probably fielded this question many times before, but I'm too lazy to look for previous threads on the subject (hey I'm just being honest). Anyway, I have a 2010 GT Premium but it doesn't include the Track Pack option that was available that year. I've had the car for over a year, and now I'm itching to start taking it to a track (which will be new for me. I've only ever been to drag strips). If I'd have known earlier I'd want to do this, I would have held out for a Track Pack version of this car, or maybe even saved up further for a Boss 302. Anyway, what do you guys suggest are the most important modifications I need to make to get a 2010 GT Premium in track-ready condition? I already have 19" wheels (running 245/45 size tires).

I should add here that I'm much more interested in suspension/handling/braking mods right now, rather than engine mods. I've already massaged my engine and exhaust a bit, and I'm not interested in GT-500 levels of horsepower here. I'm looking for hot lapping,cornering, braking, et al. Based on minimal research thus far I'm looking at swapping tires (from current all-season to an ultra high performance summer), coil-overs spring/shocks, firmer bushings, and larger disk and calipers.

Thoughts?

5LHO 04-24-2016 10:43 PM

Good tires and driver training....

Recon 04-24-2016 10:46 PM

Modify GT for track
 
GT500 brakes
Subframe connectors
Cast Camber plates
Coilovers
Sway bars
K member
Control arms
Panhard bar
Proper set up and alignment
Wider wheels and good tires
Things off the top of my head.


Respect the Classics.

bobbydgo 04-24-2016 11:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Recon (Post 2359759)
GT500 brakes
Subframe connectors
Cast Camber plates
Coilovers
Sway bars
K member
Control arms
Panhard bar
Proper set up and alignment
Wider wheels and good tires
Things off the top of my head.


Respect the Classics.

Great info, thank you! I have 245/45 19's front and rear right now. How key is it to go with something wider? Can I live with a ultra-performance tires on the current rims, or do I really want to go wider right off the bat?

Redonblackpony 04-24-2016 11:00 PM

I would suggest running your car in the stock form with upgraded brake pads, dot 4 fluid and good street tires (300 or lower treadwear). Get to know the car and the handling characteristics.
Eventually you Will want different springs, shocks and suspension components.
Seat time is the best thing!


Sent from my iPhone using Mustang Evolution

bobbydgo 04-24-2016 11:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Redonblackpony (Post 2359762)
I would suggest running your car in the stock form with upgraded brake pads, dot 4 fluid and good street tires (300 or lower treadwear). Get to know the car and the handling characteristics.
Eventually you Will want different springs, shocks and suspension components.
Seat time is the best thing!


Sent from my iPhone using Mustang Evolution

Thanks! I'm probably worrying too much about the car and not enough about getting some track time under my belt first.

Pcanno167 04-24-2016 11:45 PM

Bobbydgo,

I am glad that you brought this up. My main goal right not is to beef up my suspension as well. However, I am a self-proclaimed Wus. There is no way that I am going to put my car on the track unless i can afford to replace it with another one. The Youtube video fails got me to thinking of the excuses that my insurance company would not buy.

As for suspension upgrades here are mine - Actually, I will be installing them over the next two weeks.

RTR Street tactical performance springs

koni-Yellow stuts and shocks
cast and camber plates
BMR Upper Control Arm )(adjustable) and Bracket
BMR Adjustable Lower Control Arm and relocation bracket
Whiteline Watts Link
Hotchkiss front and rear anti-roll bars.

Potential Regrets - I wish had went with the coil overs - I avoided them because they require periodic adjustments to dial in your preferences. I seen some respectable coilovers on one of the sites for around than $1,000. I highly recommend that you do your research - from what I am reading, all coil overs are not built equally - adjustability will be key. 2). From my readings, it should have went with a non-adjustable lower control arm such as the Hotchkiss LCA. I am hearing that the combination of adjustable UCA and LCAs is a "biscuit" to dial in. Also be careful of the style of bushings. I am learning that the sperical ends are near maintenance free but makes noises and may not be the best for DD. Most of my parts were ordered with polyurethane bushings.

As for the watts link, from my brief research, I have found that many mustang drivers how installed the kits, stated that it should have been their first upgrade. The watts link gets rid of the pan hard bar, and better reduces the wheel hop and overall traction.

I recommend that you question and do your own research on the particular watts link to use. My selection was due to the 100% bolt on qualities as well as the responses that I read. Other opinions are out there.

I have read that some have verbally punished others for placing modifications that that may not be fully used on the track. One of my good friends keep beating me up over the same. The BL is I want the cornering experience and "capability"....so what if I don't use it. Plus, I want a 'new' car. when my 2013 mustang approached 70,000 miles, I knew that I had to keep her. She drives just as good as she drove at 10K. I am committed to putting 250K miles on her, and this is part of my investment.

Hope this helps.

Pcanno167 04-24-2016 11:52 PM

Agree Bobbydgo,

K -members and subframe connectors are next on my list. Wider tires (anticipating a $1800 - $3,000 cost) will follow later.

As for the Pan-hard bar, if you go with the pan-hard in lieu of a watts link, be sure to get an adjustable one. You ill need it to bring the rear wheels back in line under the car after you drop it. I made the mistake of not ordering a pan hard bar from the beginning.

cjsilen 04-25-2016 11:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bobbydgo (Post 2359756)
Hey guys, many of you have probably fielded this question many times before, but I'm too lazy to look for previous threads on the subject (hey I'm just being honest). Anyway, I have a 2010 GT Premium but it doesn't include the Track Pack option that was available that year. I've had the car for over a year, and now I'm itching to start taking it to a track (which will be new for me. I've only ever been to drag strips). If I'd have known earlier I'd want to do this, I would have held out for a Track Pack version of this car, or maybe even saved up further for a Boss 302. Anyway, what do you guys suggest are the most important modifications I need to make to get a 2010 GT Premium in track-ready condition? I already have 19" wheels (running 245/45 size tires).

I should add here that I'm much more interested in suspension/handling/braking mods right now, rather than engine mods. I've already massaged my engine and exhaust a bit, and I'm not interested in GT-500 levels of horsepower here. I'm looking for hot lapping,cornering, braking, et al. Based on minimal research thus far I'm looking at swapping tires (from current all-season to an ultra high performance summer), coil-overs spring/shocks, firmer bushings, and larger disk and calipers.

Thoughts?

Call Cortex Racing and talk to Philip, he will tell you what to do, after all that's all they do.

Fabman 04-25-2016 11:56 AM

My first question would be what is your end game.
If you think you may get serious about tracking your car you would make different choices than if you might just hit a few track days a year on hard (street) tires.
Good handling comes down to efficient management of weight transfer. These cars are heavy and as you go around a corner/brake/accelerate etc. that weight must transfer and you have to manage it.
The better the tires grip (sticky tires) the more that weight transfer is expressed as body roll. The harder the tires, the more that weight is expressed as lateral transfer (sliding).

Basically, the better the tires, the stiffer the suspension is going to have to be to manage the weight transfer the car is going to generate. This means more/better components.

If you are just going to go have a few fun runs a year on hard street tires you can get by with a lot less, but you wont go nearly as fast. Or spend as much money.

My advice to you is spend some time thinking about what you want to get out of the car and what you are willing to spend to get there. If you are going to take a trip you are going to need destination and a map.

Fabman 04-25-2016 12:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cjsilen (Post 2359857)
Call Cortex Racing and talk to Philip, he will tell you what to do, after all that's all they do.

My track car is Cortex equipped.
They have a nice track pack available that would take all the guesswork out of it.
Xtreme-Grip S197 Suspension System, Street – Complete , 2005-2014 S197 Mustang

Super good stuff for sure, but at 4400.00 (Plus various options) its a bit pricey.
It really depends on what he wants to spend and what he wants to get out of it.
If he is serious about tracking, I say definitely start there. If he is just going to play once in a while on hard tires he would be fine with some Bilstiens or Koni adjustables and an eibach pro kit or sportlines. That's where I started and it was awesome with street tires. Once I put track only tires on it generated enough grip to bottom all the shocks and the handling went straight to hell. I ended up selling all my street stuff and going to Cortex coilovers and 500 pound springs. I could have saved myself a ton of time and money by starting with the good stuff but I wasn't realistic about what I was going to do. That's why I'm encouraging him to think about the end game first.

noldevin 04-25-2016 01:53 PM

Take care of the safety stuff first.
Track brake pads, DOT4 brake fluid, good helmet.
Then maintenance...
Oil chage, trans fluid, diff fluid, etc...
Then seat time. As you get better, you will figure out what needs to change. If you have to ask what mods to get (unless you're asking something like "my car is oversteering mid corner, how do i fix it?"), you don't need mods yet.
Lighter/wider wheels and better tires will probably come first, then your suspension will need to catch up to the extra grip. And so on.

It is important that you don't just throw a bunch of parts at your car all at once and not know what is changing what. Just address things as they start to hold you back.

Jza1736 04-25-2016 04:35 PM

Rli track day insurance or locton affinity. If you can't afford to leave it there.

Sent from my SM-N920P using Tapatalk

Fabman 04-25-2016 05:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by noldevin (Post 2359891)
Take care of the safety stuff first.
Track brake pads, DOT4 brake fluid, good helmet.
Then maintenance...
Oil chage, trans fluid, diff fluid, etc...
Then seat time. As you get better, you will figure out what needs to change. If you have to ask what mods to get (unless you're asking something like "my car is oversteering mid corner, how do i fix it?"), you don't need mods yet.
Lighter/wider wheels and better tires will probably come first, then your suspension will need to catch up to the extra grip. And so on.

It is important that you don't just throw a bunch of parts at your car all at once and not know what is changing what. Just address things as they start to hold you back.

This is some sound advice right here ^^^^^


05:29 AM

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