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Sorry guys just looking for some quick answers. I'm going to replace my drive shaft, and my rear end. With the drive shaft I am looking at a aluminum one on a.m. are that much gains from this or would a shaft from Craigslist or junk yard be fine? Also I haven't done much research on the rear end as far as what is stock. Any suggestions on what I can replace it with. I'm just looking for minimal power gains nothing crazy. Any help will be appreciated.
 

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when I purchased an alum DS for my 01 V6 (T-5 Trans 7.5 rear end all OEM) I purchased one from the 5.0 and it fit right in no issues so the same size on 94-95 5.0 should work.
 

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Do you have one? And no not BIG gains but an aluminum driveshaft along with a alum flywheel for a Manuel will result in less horsepower being lost from the crank to the rear wheels. Think of it this way, does it take more energy to roll a 30lbs log or a 10 lb log
 

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An aluminum would be a better investment for two reasons. 1: it is less rotation mass so your acceleration would be quicker. I noticed a huge difference switching from the heavy steel flywheel to the light and pretty aluminum flywheel. 2: from what I heard, the aluminum DS takes a lot of the vibration out of the drivetrain. Which is good for comfort and drivetrain longevity.
 

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Dgerow12 said:
No problem man! I just hate when people throw around bad information
Yeah there are assumptions and then legit experience. I try to convince everyone about the huge difference an aluminum flywheel makes. I'm hopin to get a aluminum DS soon. Just the cut down on vibration alone has me sold! Lol
 

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Yea well some members like to throw around information that isn't very accurate or accurate at all because they think they know everything. I just know if it was my car that I was asking advice about that I would want accurate information
 

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I have found a 7.5 rearend with 373 gears. Everything I have read online leads ne to believe that the gears are not stock. Is this correct? Looks like 273 and 327 are stock. Would there be any gains from the 373 gear?
 

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3.73 is not stock. If you have a 5 speed this is the best gear choice in my opinion. If your car is a 94-98 your stock gear is 2.73 if your car is 99-04 then they are 3.27
 

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Sorry guys just looking for some quick answers. I'm going to replace my drive shaft, and my rear end. With the drive shaft I am looking at a aluminum one on a.m. are that much gains from this or would a shaft from Craigslist or junk yard be fine? Also I haven't done much research on the rear end as far as what is stock. Any suggestions on what I can replace it with. I'm just looking for minimal power gains nothing crazy. Any help will be appreciated.
An aluminum driveshaft would be the better choice. It will "slightly reduce the rotational mass and the aluminum will dampen drivetrain vibrations better than the steel, making for a smoother ride. There is little to no HP gain or recovery by using an aluminum driveshaft. The difference in most cases is just to small to measure or worry about.
 

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Here is an article on some testing done to compare the Steel vs Aluminum flywheels.


PHR - Engine Drivetrain Rear Wheels Power Increase


From everything I have researched on the subject, the aluminum flywheel is better on a race car, but for a street driven car you will be better off with a steel flywheel. Read the article and Google search Steel vs Aluminum flywheel. I'm sure you will reach the same conclusions as I have. Since my car is primarily for street use, I use a steel flywheel. The benefits of the aluminum flywheel would soon be eaten up by the cost of replacing the clutch more often due to the need to slip the clutch more for a smooth take off on the street with an aluminum flywheel.
 

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Trojan Horse said:
Here is an article on some testing done to compare the Steel vs Aluminum flywheels.

PHR - Engine Drivetrain Rear Wheels Power Increase

From everything I have researched on the subject, the aluminum flywheel is better on a race car, but for a street driven car you will be better off with a steel flywheel. Read the article and Google search Steel vs Aluminum flywheel. I'm sure you will reach the same conclusions as I have. Since my car is primarily for street use, I use a steel flywheel. The benefits of the aluminum flywheel would soon be eaten up by the cost of replacing the clutch more often due to the need to slip the clutch more for a smooth take off on the street with an aluminum flywheel.
I disagree, purely from experience. The only thing a heavier steel flywheel is good for is people how cant work a clutch. You have more rotating weight thus making starts easier. I have had my aluminum flywheel for a full year with no problems and drivability is fine. You just got to get use to less weight. It takes like a week tops to re learn starts. I think an aluminum flywheel is an excellent choice for anyone wanting a quicker car.
 

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I disagree, purely from experience. The only thing a heavier steel flywheel is good for is people how cant work a clutch. You have more rotating weight thus making starts easier. I have had my aluminum flywheel for a full year with no problems and drivability is fine. You just got to get use to less weight. It takes like a week tops to re learn starts. I think an aluminum flywheel is an excellent choice for anyone wanting a quicker car.
That's fine and I disagree with your disagreement, purely from experience too. I've been "working" clutches for over 40 years and I have driven many cars with aluminum flywheels. To get a good smooth take off you have to slip the clutch more than you do with a heavier steel flywheel. That's pretty much all there is to learning how to drive with one.


They are great for faster accleration and deceleration on a race track, but for everyday use my choice will always be a good cast iron or steel flywheel. I spent many hours reading and researching the differences and usage suitability between the two flywheels. Most everything I read other than just someone's opinion about them or personal preference, pretty much agrees with my final decision on which flywheel to use for street or track.


Your preferences are just "your preferences", not really which is better suited to any particular usage or person. If that's what you like and prefer, that's great, but it may not be best for someone else. :good:
 
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