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Hi! I'm new here I'm the owner of a 1987 Mustang GT 5.0 with T-Tops. I was wondering if anyone could give me any information on this car. Like if the car is rare or any Production Numbers, any info will be grately appreciated. VIN#1FABP42E4HF246469
 

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Hi! I'm new here I'm the owner of a 1987 Mustang GT 5.0 with T-Tops. I was wondering if anyone could give me any information on this car. Like if the car is rare or any Production Numbers, any info will be grately appreciated. VIN#1FABP42E4HF246469

I owned a car identical to yours, a 1987 GT with T-tops. Fun car, I hope you're enjoying it as much as I did mine.

Might be best to contact Ford directly with your question, they would be the only one to know for sure, since they keep track of things like that.

Ford Motor Company
Customer Relationship Center
P.O. Box 6248
Dearborn, MI 48126

I'd write them a letter with all your info, VIN, and your question. Then they will contact you and you will probably get a letter back from them with the info on a nice Ford letterhead, and you can keep that with all your records for the car. There are lots of unconfirmed numbers out there, best way to know for sure is to go straight to the source.

Remember, rarity doesn't always mean more valuable, demand and condition always dictate prices. That being said, something that isn't demand this year can always be next year.. I say enjoy it and don't worry about it too much.
 

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I owned a car identical to yours, a 1987 GT with T-tops. Fun car, I hope you're enjoying it as much as I did mine.

Might be best to contact Ford directly with your question, they would be the only one to know for sure, since they keep track of things like that.

Ford Motor Company
Customer Relationship Center
P.O. Box 6248
Dearborn, MI 48126

I'd write them a letter with all your info, VIN, and your question. Then they will contact you and you will probably get a letter back from them with the info on a nice Ford letterhead, and you can keep that with all your records for the car. There are lots of unconfirmed numbers out there, best way to know for sure is to go straight to the source.

Remember, rarity doesn't always mean more valuable, demand and condition always dictate prices. That being said, something that isn't demand this year can always be next year.. I say enjoy it and don't worry about it too much.
Agree with this part the most. I've sold cars before that are anything but rare, as a collective, but in my area(around 150 miles minimum) near impossible to find. That being the case people were more willing to pay a premium for the cars because they could see it and not have to either drive/fly across the country and/or buy a car without seeing it.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I was just hoping to get production numbers on the car, I've been having trouble getting numbers and maybe determining the value of the car.
 

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I was just hoping to get production numbers on the car, I've been having trouble getting numbers and maybe determining the value of the car.
I can tell you what I normally do...cross reference a few sources.

I'll go to KBB.com, then do a real-world quote, being honest about the conditions, options, and look at the private party and trade values.

From there, look at Autotrader.com and see if you can find comparable vehicles, comparable year/make/model/mileage... and average out the values of several of them. These are usually close to your actual values.

Then look at eBay.com and do the same search, nationwide, comparable year/make/model/mileage/options, etc... and look at the "completed listings", this is the critical part. Find several if you can and average out the prices of them. Completed listings will give you a real-world value on what folks are willing to pay for a car similar to yours TODAY, not what they hope to get SOME DAY. There are a lot of "dreamers" out there selling cars for prices they just aren't worth...then they sit on them, keep paying carrying costs, and might not ever sell the car.

It's not about the prices they're asking, the price they're asking is irrelevant. For example, i'm asking $50,000 for a particular car because I know it's a rare color and option combination. The most the particular cars are going for on actual completed sales is $10,000, I would expect the example car to bring about $10,000 plus or minus a grand.

It's a lot of work, but any serious buyer will go do the homework, and know what they're willing to pay. I feel when i'm selling, it's my job to know what a fair market value is, and price my car accordingly so it sells well and quickly. If you don't know what the car is worth, you might ask way too much and never sell, or ask way too little and lose out...

I relate to you more than you know, I was laid off in 2004 and needed cash badly, so my Mustang T-Top car went up for sale. I was stubborn, convinced my car was worth a whole knot of cash, and refused to budge on my price... fast forward 14 months, and I was finally able to sell, at a greatly reduced price, even less than I'd turned down reasonable cash offers for several months before. In the end, i screwed myself out of a good deal of money because I didn't know my market, held out too long, and hurt myself financially when i needed that the least.
 
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