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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, I’m starting to see AGM batteries available everywhere. I got one for my Crown Vic and it seems okay so far, but its still new. I hear mixed opinions about them locally, and some people really espouse the dependably of the Optima AGM.

Apparently there are some positive aspects I hadn’t considered as follows;

AGM's can tolerate a higher float charge voltage than flooded cell, so should last longer in a typical automotive charging system. Once fully charged, flooded cell batteries should be held not above 13.2v; AGM's are OK up to around 13.6v. But automotive voltage regulators are usually about 14v-14.2v, which basically constantly overcharges the battery, but AGM's by a smaller margin than flooded cell.
Other benefits mentioned are;
AGM's don't die if the water level goes below the top of the plates. They're not destroyed by freezing if they're discharged too far in cold weather. They don't outgas corrosive gases when they're charged, so battery terminals don't corrode. They don't spill corrosive electrolyte that makes holes in your jeans and rusts away your battery tray. In short, they're more expensive, but more than worth it
So, what do you guys think?
 
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I bought a Optima battery in 2008 for my 2007 Dodge. I traded it in for my 2011 Mustang. After a little over 7 years my factory battery was going bad in my Mustang. I read that the Optima quality had gone down hill through the years. I think they moved their factory or something like that several years ago. I've read good things and bad things. Since my factory battery lasted over 7 years, I went down to my local Ford dealer and bought a regular battery from them for $150.

Good luck and let us know how it goes :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for replying. My original battery lasted 4 years in my Mustang. It was still strong when I replaced it, but it was leaking and I couldn’t keep up with the cleaning. I replaced it with a duralast gold and was was leaking after a week. Took it back, and they replaced it. That one has been fine now for a few years,

I’m just thinking that I may have avoided the whole acid debacle if I had went with AGM. So I’m hoping several people will weigh in and school me.
 

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AGM has another small down side: For the same form factor, generally they have a little bit of increased weight over a standard battery.....if that matters.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
In my case, that’s not a concern, but I can see where it may be for others. It’s definitely something to take into consideration when making the decisio.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I found this video interesting. It seems the Walmart Everstart is the champion for flooded acid batteries, and the DieHard is the winner for AGM brands. From what this video shows, traditional lead-acid batteries have the win where making power is concerned, but I’d be willing to sacrifice some CA/CCA to avoid dealing with corrosive off-gassing. At least in my Mustang.

Here’s the video …

 

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Wish I would have read this 30 minutes ago. Just got back from O'Rielly's because my battery was going bad. Ended up going with their brand for $159. We'll see how well it does.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
O’Riley batters seem to be pretty good. I wouldn’t sweat it. All the batteries I’ve had, produced plenty of power. I’m now focused on avoiding off-gassing and corrosion prevention. I believe AGM probably takes the W in that category.
 

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I put an Odyssey AGM battery in my Mustang. It quit after four years and change, which was a bit less than I was expecting from it. However, no corrosive outgassing issues and higher tolerance to deep discharge cycles. The available battery that fits our cars is a bit smaller (in terms of physical size and capacity) than the factory battery, so that may have been a contributor to the shorter-than-expected life. I replaced it with a Die Hard flooded cell (although Bruce Willis did not come to install it for me).

This is a bit OT, but when restoring my Dad's '69 Camaro, we had big issues with corrosive outgassing actually rusting the valance panel. To correct it, I replaced the electromechanical voltage regulator with an electronic unit (suspecting an overcharge condition) and installed the same Odyssey AGM battery that was in my Mustang. That car is garaged and not driven much, so the AGM battery is doing great and has no issues starting a cast-iron small block. ;)
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I put an Odyssey AGM battery in my Mustang. It quit after four years and change, which was a bit less than I was expecting from it. However, no corrosive outgassing issues and higher tolerance to deep discharge cycles. The available battery that fits our cars is a bit smaller (in terms of physical size and capacity) than the factory battery, so that may have been a contributor to the shorter-than-expected life. I replaced it with a Die Hard flooded cell (although Bruce Willis did not come to install it for me).

This is a bit OT, but when restoring my Dad's '69 Camaro, we had big issues with corrosive outgassing actually rusting the valance panel. To correct it, I replaced the electromechanical voltage regulator with an electronic unit (suspecting an overcharge condition) and installed the same Odyssey AGM battery that was in my Mustang. That car is garaged and not driven much, so the AGM battery is doing great and has no issues starting a cast-iron small block. ;)
Fits my conclusions (right or wrong). When I need another battery for the Mustang or the 370Z, I’m going AGM due to the gassing of the lead-acid type. I don’t really care if it lasts a year less or not, as long as I know it’s not damaging my cars. I’ve had really bad luck with batteries in the Mustang. They have all seemed to have leaking or gassing problems. I can deal with that in a beater truck, but not my go-fast cars.
 

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Fits my conclusions (right or wrong). When I need another battery for the Mustang or the 370Z, I’m going AGM due to the gassing of the lead-acid type. I don’t really care if it lasts a year less or not, as long as I know it’s not damaging my cars. I’ve had really bad luck with batteries in the Mustang. They have all seemed to have leaking or gassing problems. I can deal with that in a beater truck, but not my go-fast cars.
Totally with you there. Pissed me off when I noticed it on the Camaro since it was rusting a near-unobtainium NOS valence panel I had put on. Fortunately I caught it when it was just surface rust and a bit of sandpaper and POR-15 took care of the issue.

I am less concerned about outgassing in my Mustang as I have a fiberglass Cervini hood on the thing...couldn't stand the stupid aluminum rot of the factory hood (which continues even though the thing sits in my humidity-controlled basement). Ugh.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Totally with you there. Pissed me off when I noticed it on the Camaro since it was rusting a near-unobtainium NOS valence panel I had put on. Fortunately I caught it when it was just surface rust and a bit of sandpaper and POR-15 took care of the issue.

I am less concerned about outgassing in my Mustang as I have a fiberglass Cervini hood on the thing...couldn't stand the stupid aluminum rot of the factory hood (which continues even though the thing sits in my humidity-controlled basement). Ugh.
My original hood developed the bubblies too. Ford dealer gave me a new GT500 hood to help flow air through the heat-extractor and radiator. It made a big difference in air intake temps, and A/C efficiency. Also no more paint bubblies.
 

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My original hood developed the bubblies too. Ford dealer gave me a new GT500 hood to help flow air through the heat-extractor and radiator. It made a big difference in air intake temps, and A/C efficiency. Also no more paint bubblies.
Nice! My dealer told me to pound sand because there was no hole in the panel.
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Nice! My dealer told me to pound sand because there was no hole in the panel.
I’ve actually had very good luck with this dealership. They’re performanc-mod friendly, and the body shop crew are good to. They are a production shop, but I’ve had them install custom mods (spoiler, scoops, etc…), they were economical and did a fabulous job. I can’t complain.
 

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I worked for the Department of Defense, we bought $15,000 a month in batteries, we then switched to Interstate Batteries and used a product called Pulse Tech on our batteries. NO more gassing, and the battery life increased to almost 8 years.The Pulse Tech system cleans all of the build up off of the plates and puts it back into the solution. It also increases the battery performance. I use one on my Mustang, and my original battery lasted over 8 years and NO gassing. My current battery is an Interstate.Just my $02.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I used to buy Interstate batteries exclusively. However, one hot Texas day, I drove my ‘86 Nissan PU-Truck home, and parked in the street in front of my house. I was peeling my uniform off, when my wife started screaming Fire! Fire!. I came running out just in time to watch my truck burning down to the ground (I’ll dig out a pic and upload it later).

The battery shorted internally and caught on fire. By the time it was noticed, and I got outside, it was all over but the crying. Man it made a mess. The top half of the battery was gone and the plates were melted down. I’d never seen one do that before. I realize it was just bad luck, and anecdotal, but I’ve been gun-shy on them ever since. I only had liability on the truck, so it was a total loss. I think about this every time I hear about Lithium battery fires.

Aren’t the EV cars powered by Lithium batteries?
 
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Yes,Just like RC models I had 2 friends who had there houses burn down, because they didn"t have those batteries stored in there FIRE PROOF containers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Yes,Just like RC models I had 2 friends who had there houses burn down, because they didn"t have those batteries stored in there FIRE PROOF containers.
Yet another good reason to avoid EV technology… I wonder if the EV car is just a big Fireproof container :ROFLMAO:

I use one on my Mustang
Is this a device you install on your car, or an external charging device?
 

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Click on the link,there is a ton of info on this product,and read how it helps and saves batteries,I was involved in there pilot program 30 years ago.Great company.
 
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