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Discussion Starter #1
so i'm ready to install an aluminum flywheel but now i'm hearing things like it's gonna warp, or it's gonna mess up my idle and eng. operation. is this true?
my flywheel is a spec...oh yeah and they sent me the wrong one at first (the crank bolt holes were too small) and then they sent me the right one, but this time it has no weight on it and it looks like they just drilled bigger holes!? should i go ahead and install that flywheel? my car is a '94. thanks for the help!
 

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I wish i could help but i know nothing about flywheels lol
 

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Actually aluminum will warp if the alloy is not the right type. back in the 60's and up to the early 80's they used cheap alloy's. There have been great strides in aluminum alloy and it is not the problem it once was!!! So I would not worry about warping !!!!
 

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leave it to corey :) 40+ years of knowledge
 

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Discussion Starter #7
thanks for the input! but it's gonna be a while before i put it in...i wanna do it myself.
 

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Well actually aluminum still warps if it gets too hot and also if you leave it laying around in a manner that it's not flat against the ground. Gravity will pull on the aluminum and warp it. So if it is a long time until you install the flywheel make sure you stand it upright. Same things goes for our aluminum heads, and that's also why overheating the engine can be a problem, but in flywheels I don't see it being too much of a problem unless you ride the clutch for long periods, but then you'll have to replace your clutch also. The only thing is I would e-mail SPEC back and ask about it not having any weights on it. The only flywheels that I know of that didn't require weights are the internally balanced V6's which was from '01+. Finally, make sure when you do go to install the flywheel that you put the bolts on in a criss cross pattern and that you have the right side facing outwards. Flywheels can be installed backwards.
 

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Yes all aluminum can warp but in reality depending on the alloy the new aluminums can take terrific amounts of heat. Such as cylinder walls of a engine block or exhaust parts!!!
 

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Danger Dude said:
Yes all aluminum can warp but in reality depending on the alloy the new aluminums can take terrific amounts of heat. Such as cylinder walls of a engine block or exhaust parts!!!
Right, I was just stating that it can warp, but on our cars, you still have to becareful because the heads can still warp do to overheating, but aluminum cools quickly so it would have to be constantly kept at certain temp for it to start warping. If we or I knew the type of alum. I could give more precise data. So, I wonder what type of alum. our heads are made from and that flywheel. We use 1100, 2017, 2024, 2117,5052, 6061, and 7075 alum on the aircraft. 2024 is the main type of alum on 90% of aircraft now, 5052 is not allowed but for boxes and other stuff. 6061 and 7075 are rarely used, they're to strong and brittle, but cars don't fly and don't use alum skins or frames. I would bet it's a 7 series alum.
 

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Danger Dude said:
I review all the Fab work packages for the C-130's here at Lockheed and 2024 T2 and 7075 are widely used for structures.
Don't you mean 2024-T3? On the C-130 7075-T6 is used more widely because of it's mission and older tech. And BTW I work in Aircraft Structural Maint. I think I told you this before.
 

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What did you edit in my first post Corey. HUH mister???!!!!!:D
 

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I did not edit anything. Once again I hit the edit button instead of the quote button. Senior moment. I have asked Brent to move the buttons away from each other !!!

On the aluminum alloy for heads here is something I have found

Alloy 356.0

Applications for 356.0 are similar to those for 355.0. Alloy 356.0 has excellent casting characteristics and has largely replaced alloy 295.0.

Permanent mold castings of this alloy are used for machine tool parts, aircraft wheels and hand wheels, pump parts, tank car fittings, marine hardware, valve bodies and bridge railing parts, as well as for aileron control sectors, rudder control supports, fuselage fittings and fuel tank elbows for airplanes and missiles. Automotive applications include miscellaneous castings for trucks and trailers, spring brackets, cylinder heads, engine blocks, passenger car wheels and transmission cases.

Uses for sand castings of 356.0 include flywheel housings, automotive transmission cases, oil pans, rear axle housings, brackets, water-cooled cylinder blocks, various fittings and pump bodies. This alloy is used in various marine applications in the T6 condition where pressure tightness and/or corrosion resistance are major requirements.

Castability—Fluidity, resistance to hot cracking and resistance to solidification shrinkage are all excellent for 356.0.

Machinability—After heat treatment (notably in the T6 condition), 356.0 has good machinability. Because of the high Si content, savings can be realized by using carbide-tipped cutting tools. Rakes must be positive and high. Speeds must approach the maximum, and light cuts must be taken.

Finishing—Alloy 356.0 has good polishing characteristics. It is excellent for electroplating and good for chemical conversion coatings. Anodizing appearance is good, and the color is gray.

Weldability—Good welding characteristics are shown by 356.0 for all standard welding methods. The alloy is not brazed.

Corrosion Resistance—Excellent resistance to corrosion is shown by 356.0. Chemical conversion coatings give further protection.

Alloy A356.0

Alloy A356.0 has greater elongation, higher strength and considerably higher ductility than 356.0. It has these improved mechanical properties because impurities are lower in A356.0 than in 356.0. Typical applications are airframe castings, machine parts, truck chassis parts, aircraft and missile components, and structural parts requiring high strength.

Castability—All casting characteristics are excellent for this alloy.

Machinability—Alloy A356.0 has good machinability. Abrasiveness can be overcome and high tool wear can be minimized by using sharp, carbide-tipped tools with high rakes and clearances. Moderate to fast speeds are recommended.

Finishing—Electroplated finishes are good. Chemical conversion coatings give good protection, but anodized appearance is only fair. Mechanical finishes on A356.0 are good.

Weldability—All common welding methods are excellent for joining this alloy. Brazing is not performed.

Corrosion Resistance—This alloy has good resistance to most forms of corrosion.
 

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97Stallion said:
Don't you mean 2024-T3? On the C-130 7075-T6 is used more widely because of it's mission and older tech. And BTW I work in Aircraft Structural Maint. I think I told you this before.
:chin: hmmm, that's very interesting, sounds just like 7075-T6. And did you read that post I quoted?
 

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97Stallion said:
Don't you mean 2024-T3? On the C-130 7075-T6 is used more widely because of it's mission and older tech. And BTW I work in Aircraft Structural Maint. I think I told you this before.
You have told me that. Before I was a Quality Engineer I was a Structures and APG mechanic.:)
 

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Discussion Starter #17
97Stallion said:
Well actually aluminum still warps if it gets too hot and also if you leave it laying around in a manner that it's not flat against the ground. Gravity will pull on the aluminum and warp it. So if it is a long time until you install the flywheel make sure you stand it upright. Same things goes for our aluminum heads, and that's also why overheating the engine can be a problem, but in flywheels I don't see it being too much of a problem unless you ride the clutch for long periods, but then you'll have to replace your clutch also. The only thing is I would e-mail SPEC back and ask about it not having any weights on it. The only flywheels that I know of that didn't require weights are the internally balanced V6's which was from '01+. Finally, make sure when you do go to install the flywheel that you put the bolts on in a criss cross pattern and that you have the right side facing outwards. Flywheels can be installed backwards.
i called spec already and they told me that it's not supposed to have a weight and it's a billet flywheel, whatever that means... and i don't see how you could install a flywheel backwards:confused:
 

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kinda got off topic there for a second, whew, atleast were talking about the flywheel again.
 

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widowvirgin said:
i called spec already and they told me that it's not supposed to have a weight and it's a billet flywheel, whatever that means... and i don't see how you could install a flywheel backwards:confused:
Billet means it was either turned, carved or forged out of a solid piece of aluminum instaed of cast from molten aluminum into a form. Casting can crack or be less strong due to voids that are common in castings

Billet is better :)
 
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