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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi everyone, I am getting ready to order my suspension upgrades this weekend and want to make sure I'm not missing anything. I mostly plan to enjoy it as a second (5th, if I'm being honest) vehicle, but I also love the twisties and I would like to get into doing some road courses. The car is a 2013 GT base with an automatic transmission. I am extremely thankful for your time and help!

I plan to order Eibach Multi-Pro R2 coilovers, Maximum Motorsports caster camber plates, BMR strut tower brace, adjustable rear upper and lower control arms, LCA relocation brackets, UCA mounting bracket, front and rear sway bars and Whiteline Watts Link. Also a Steeda Rear Chassis X-Brace, ball joint kit and bumpsteer Kit and RTR front sway bar end links.

Any insight would be great, I've done some suspension stuff (complete air ride a couple of times as well as ball joints, shocks/struts, etc.), but this will be by far the most involved suspension upgrafe I've done. I'm not intimidated by the build, I look forward to planting the car's power to the ground!

Thanks in advance!

-Lee (AKA MadeULook)
 

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Hi everyone, I am getting ready to order my suspension upgrades this weekend and want to make sure I'm not missing anything. I mostly plan to enjoy it as a second (5th, if I'm being honest) vehicle, but I also love the twisties and I would like to get into doing some road courses. The car is a 2013 GT base with an automatic transmission. I am extremely thankful for your time and help!

I plan to order Eibach Multi-Pro R2 coilovers, Maximum Motorsports caster camber plates, 1. BMR strut tower brace, 2. adjustable rear upper and lower control arms, LCA relocation brackets, UCA mounting bracket, 3. front and rear sway bars and Whiteline Watts Link. 4. Also a Steeda Rear Chassis X-Brace, 5. ball joint kit and bumpsteer Kit and RTR front sway bar end links.

Any insight would be great, I've done some suspension stuff (complete air ride a couple of times as well as ball joints, shocks/struts, etc.), but this will be by far the most involved suspension upgrafe I've done. I'm not intimidated by the build, I look forward to planting the car's power to the ground!

Thanks in advance!

-Lee (AKA MadeULook)
1. I really dont think a strut tower brace is needed on the S197 chassis, however, if i were going to get one i would get the BMR. Its the only one that actually reinforces towards the firewall, which is the ideal design.

2. Adjustable upper is needed if you get a one piece driveshaft, which i dont see on your list, so if you dont get a one piece driveshaft you can skip it. IF however, you do get an UCA, you will need an aftermarket bracket for it as well to avoid any sort of clunking.
The Adjustable lower control arms however, i would skip. Realistically, unless you're out racing and chasing lap times and making adjustment after adjustment its going to do you more harm than good. You'll be fine with fixed length.

3. Honestly, i would skip the sway bars as well. I personally am not a fan of dumping a ton of new suspension parts on all at once, especially ones that are adjustable. The reason i say this, is because if the car is behaving a certain way you have no idea what part did it, and where to start adjusting to fix it. I personally believe less is more. Maybe you're a better driver than me, but it took me 6 track weekends (that's 48 track sessions) to be faster than my 5.0 with OEM boss shocks / struts / springs and 295 nitto NT-05 tires on stock brakes. It took me a very long time to get to the point where the car was holding me back and not the other way around. For the record too, i am solo qualified in my run group, so i'm halfway decent, just for the sake of giving that comment some perspective.
Where i am going with this, is i am now able to tell how the car is behaving in certain corners, and more importantly, how i want it to behave. It is at this point i would add adjustable sway bars to start getting the car to behave. If i had thrown them on at the beginning, my driving would not have been consistent enough for me to know what the hell was going on and i'd be chasing my tail in circles making arbitrary adjustments to things.

4. Skip it. All show, no go.

5. I'd skip these as well. They're a lot of upkeep and at the more casual level you'll be driving, not really needed. The S197 chassis geometry takes being lowered fairly well.
 

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The build is going to be badass! The only 2 things I see is you don't need the LCA to be adjustable, I would actually avoid them, and a tower strut brace won't help as the body is pretty stiff already.

Wish I could could get the watts link that might be next for me!


Sent from my iPhone using Mustang Evolution
 

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If your not experienced enough to tell what works and doesn't, then i would get springs/shocks and sway bars from eibach as a matched set. As was said the car will out drive you for some time. Also the ball joints and street bump steer kit from steeda (i believe made by Pro forged where i got mine cheaper) work and don't require the maintenance that was mentioned. Also you didn't mention tires and brakes which are probably the first things you would notice on road track. Good luck.
 

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I'm in total agreement with Voltwings...whenever you try and throw a lot of suspension mods all at once you can really chase your tail when trying to find any issues. I second the sway bars...that would be one of the last things I'd do to the suspension.
Unless you've had a lot of experience with adjustable LCA's I'd pass although I would get non-adjustable LCA's to match the adjustable UPC.
One very important part you are missing...and this is a must if you are going to track the car is a UCA differential bushing kit...BMR Suspension EN001, Differential Bushing Kit, 2005 - 2014 Mustang | eBay
My guess is that your OE bushing is starting to crack and split...take a close look at it! Using poly bushings on the UCA/LCA's will put even more of a load on the stock OE differential bushing...something you really don't want to fail.
Another thing you might think about is to put the Shelby clutch...Shelby Mustang Iso-Clutch Remote Reservoir Kit SHEL031 (10-14 All) - Free Shipping
and along with that is to put the GT500 13.8" rear rotors. I did this to mine although it makes no noticeable difference on the street it did when pushing the car to and past it limits...along with the separate clutch reservoir...just some thoughts.
 

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Sorry, I think I jumped the gun on the brake part of this since I just noticed you have the stock 13" front brakes...I thought your car was a TrakPak. I would look at some different pads if you haven't already.
One thing I missed was the Whiteline Watts Link...Although I think it is good I believe there are some on the market that may be better...and again this is one of the last things I'd put on the car or maybe even use that money for a better set of adjustable coilovers...just thinking outloud.
Take a look at my pictures for the Iso-Reservoir and what the 13.8" rear rotors look like...it's a simple change and only took about an hour.
 

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If your not experienced enough to tell what works and doesn't, then i would get springs/shocks and sway bars from eibach as a matched set. As was said the car will out drive you for some time. Also the ball joints and street bump steer kit from steeda (i believe made by Pro forged where i got mine cheaper) work and don't require the maintenance that was mentioned. Also you didn't mention tires and brakes which are probably the first things you would notice on road track. Good luck.
What are the conditions you use them in? I dont mean that to sound as argumentative as it may sound, i'm genuinely interested in the discussion here. At the track, i see people go through ball joints (on the S197 chassis) often enough that i'm not interested in changing mine. Granted, these are cars with big grip and varying amounts of aero.
 

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Don't claim to be a suspendion or track expert, however after i installed, car definitely took a better set and turns in nicely in high speed corners. Car is only 1in lowered using FRPP suspension and Koni yellows. Yes this is only seat of the pants. Obviously as you lower front end, lca geometry changes negatively. These parts return it to normal, ie lca is level or slightly lower at wheel. The parts are also matched to work together. Ball joint is heavy duty unit that has a longer shank which lowers lca. Bump steer looks like stock as well except again longer shank. Had mustang at track twice now, albeit not to its limits. Feels comfortable, but again i need to get my speed up in the corners more. If you have a ball joint press, you can change on car. At 20k, one of the stock ones was already getting loose. Bump steer is simple bolt on. I have another car that i do HPDE in mostly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thank you for all of this great info! There are a few things I want to add. This is only the suspension phase of my build. I started with the wheels and tires, mainly because I didn't want to buy new tires for the stock 18s. Tires are Mickey Thompson Street Comp. 275/35/20 & 255/35/20. After I get the suspension sorted, I plan to run big brakes front and rear (Wilwood Superlite). Most of the exhaust will go, but I'm not sure what my plan is yet. CF 1 piece driveline and either a 50 state roots style supercharger or a less than environmentally friendly procharger set up. Once I settle on which FI to use, I hope it makes it easier to sort out the exhaust. I'm not shooting for the moon, I would like to be around ~ 600 RWHP. I want to build up to that as gradually as I can, not one big jump. I doubt I'll be installing the FI until this time, next year.

1. I really dont think a strut tower brace is needed on the S197 chassis, however, if i were going to get one i would get the BMR. Its the only one that actually reinforces towards the firewall, which is the ideal design.

2. Adjustable upper is needed if you get a one piece driveshaft, which i dont see on your list, so if you dont get a one piece driveshaft you can skip it. IF however, you do get an UCA, you will need an aftermarket bracket for it as well to avoid any sort of clunking.
The Adjustable lower control arms however, i would skip. Realistically, unless you're out racing and chasing lap times and making adjustment after adjustment its going to do you more harm than good. You'll be fine with fixed length.

3. Honestly, i would skip the sway bars as well. I personally am not a fan of dumping a ton of new suspension parts on all at once, especially ones that are adjustable. The reason i say this, is because if the car is behaving a certain way you have no idea what part did it, and where to start adjusting to fix it. I personally believe less is more. Maybe you're a better driver than me, but it took me 6 track weekends (that's 48 track sessions) to be faster than my 5.0 with OEM boss shocks / struts / springs and 295 nitto NT-05 tires on stock brakes. It took me a very long time to get to the point where the car was holding me back and not the other way around. For the record too, i am solo qualified in my run group, so i'm halfway decent, just for the sake of giving that comment some perspective.
Where i am going with this, is i am now able to tell how the car is behaving in certain corners, and more importantly, how i want it to behave. It is at this point i would add adjustable sway bars to start getting the car to behave. If i had thrown them on at the beginning, my driving would not have been consistent enough for me to know what the hell was going on and i'd be chasing my tail in circles making arbitrary adjustments to things.

4. Skip it. All show, no go.

5. I'd skip these as well. They're a lot of upkeep and at the more casual level you'll be driving, not really needed. The S197 chassis geometry takes being lowered fairly well.
I plan to install the parts in small groups over a month or so. Just a couple things over that time to see how everything works together. I'm in no rush, the build has some meaning behind it for me, so I'd rather have it right, than have it quick! It'll be me and my daughter doing all the work. She is five, but she is really passionate about it, haha. I used to be an air-cooled VW mechanic (15+ years ago), so I can turn a wrench OK and follow instructions. YouTube is usually my go to, now-a-days.

I do plan to use BMR for as much as I can. I don't want to mitch-match anything and cause a headache. A 1 piece driveline is on the list, down the line. I do have an UCA bracket on my build list. I didn't know about it making a clunking noise, if not replaced. I would hate to cheap out when it comes time to purchase (tonight or tomorrow, hopefully! ) and regret it. I am taking your advice and going fixed LCA, also.

I only aspire to begin road racing as a very addictive hobby. But, now that you've revealed yourself, expect a million questions from me when I start hitting the track! Just kidding... Maybe.

You've given me some things to think about, thank you!

The build is going to be badass! The only 2 things I see is you don't need the LCA to be adjustable, I would actually avoid them, and a tower strut brace won't help as the body is pretty stiff already.

Wish I could could get the watts link that might be next for me!


Sent from my iPhone using Mustang Evolution
I'm looking forward to all of the work, good times! I am on board with ditching the Adjustable LCAs and going fixed. Thanks for the insight!

Mine has ST coil over kit, rides stiff and smooth. Sits perfect
ST Suspension Mustang Coil-Over Kit 90323 (05-14 GT, V6) - Free Shipping
That stance looks great on your car! I am guessing I will have to spend a few months dialing it in perfect. Adjust, settle, critique, repeat... Was there anything specific that made you buy the ST kit? Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
If your not experienced enough to tell what works and doesn't, then i would get springs/shocks and sway bars from eibach as a matched set. As was said the car will out drive you for some time. Also the ball joints and street bump steer kit from steeda (i believe made by Pro forged where i got mine cheaper) work and don't require the maintenance that was mentioned. Also you didn't mention tires and brakes which are probably the first things you would notice on road track. Good luck.
Thank you, for this insight. I do not have the experience, but I'm going to splurge on the coilovers. The car is special to me. I figure, I never plan to sell it, so it's worth doing right the first time. If money were tighter, there would be no question. I am a lot more excited about all of the suspension upgrades than I am about going FI. That being said, I respect my car. I know it is a monster! It will most likely "out drive" me for many years to come. I can't wait to tame this beast, slowly, but surely.
 

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I agree with the posters above... It is more productive to drive the car on the track as-is, than it is to heavily modify the suspension first. Unless, of course, you are already a seasoned race car driver.
Go do some events, get a good feel for the car, and when you honestly believe that you are able to outdrive the car, then you can start doing some mods that will make you faster. By that time, you will have a good idea of what truly needs to be done.
Also, you will meet a lot of fellow enthusiasts at the track who will be able to give you some experienced feedback on what seems to work best.
 

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You've been talking about road courses and you have three of the best road courses in the US at your door step. I have no idea of your driving level so I'll just say that if you join the San Francisco Region of the SCCA you have one of the best driving schools on the West Coast and it's held at Thunderhill every spring...which is just an hour and a half from you. That would give you a novice drivers license, a huge headstart to really developing your driving skills. You will need to rent a "real race car" and I might add that most of the time will be spent on the track with your mentor...not in the car with you though...and is just about the most fun you can have with your pants on...all you will need to do to maintain your National drivers license is to race two National races per year...without an incident. This will also allow you to participate in NASA and other track days at all three great tracks with less hassle...which will allow you to take your own car out and have fun...Thunderhill has expanded the track since I got my SCCA license...it was 2.86 miles... and is even more fun now that it is a 4.8 mile course with 27 turns...now called America's Nurburgring...and one of the most forgiving tracks of the three if you happen to do "An off and on".
I understand you want to just jump in and start modifying the Mustang...what Straybullitt said above would certainly be a first step after getting a license or at least some track time...IMHO
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
You've been talking about road courses and you have three of the best road courses in the US at your door step. I have no idea of your driving level so I'll just say that if you join the San Francisco Region of the SCCA you have one of the best driving schools on the West Coast and it's held at Thunderhill every spring...which is just an hour and a half from you. That would give you a novice drivers license, a huge headstart to really developing your driving skills. You will need to rent a "real race car" and I might add that most of the time will be spent on the track with your mentor...not in the car with you though...and is just about the most fun you can have with your pants on...all you will need to do to maintain your National drivers license is to race two National races per year...without an incident. This will also allow you to participate in NASA and other track days at all three great tracks with less hassle...which will allow you to take your own car out and have fun...Thunderhill has expanded the track since I got my SCCA license...it was 2.86 miles... and is even more fun now that it is a 4.8 mile course with 27 turns...now called America's Nurburgring...and one of the most forgiving tracks of the three if you happen to do "An off and on".
I understand you want to just jump in and start modifying the Mustang...what Straybullitt said above would certainly be a first step after getting a license or at least some track time...IMHO
I hear what you guys are saying, it's hard to fight the "mod bug" though! Haha, I appreciate the wise words, truly. I am familiar with Thunderhill, I love just about anything fast! I'm going to look into SCCA for this spring, that helps me set a goal I can work towards!
 

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I hear what you guys are saying, it's hard to fight the "mod bug" though! Haha, I appreciate the wise words, truly. I am familiar with Thunderhill, I love just about anything fast! I'm going to look into SCCA for this spring, that helps me set a goal I can work towards!
Larry Oka is one of the original people that started the Spec Miata class in SCCA racing and he is the one I rented a Spec Miata from when I took my three day drivers training. Really great person with fantastic connections within the SCCA.
A lot of things to consider and I'm sure you would never regret taking the drivers coarse...I certainly didn't.
Thunderhill was my home track when I lived in Redding and also my favorite of the three. You may like it well enough to even become a volunteer...I still have my Tech License, Sound and Safety...great fun and great people...IMHO

Larry Oka's website...Larry OKA Racing Services
 

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If you're thinking of doing road racing, I will advise you to stop right now. Don't mod the car yet. I would highly recommend attending some HPDE sessions before you even think about bolting up a single part. I don't think there's any need to rent a car, just start in a beginner group and listen to everything the instructors say.

There are a few safety things you should absolutely take care of first though: Change out your brake fluid for DOT4. Get a spare set of rotors and a set of track pads (track compounds from carbotech, g-loc, or similar). Then get some seat time with an instructor. As you get seat time it will become apparent exactly what you need to change, instead of "throwing the catalog at it."

Your next upgrade should be a square wheel setup and tires. Street comps are terrible and staggered tires aren't good for the road course, because understeer sucks.
Once you get better tires and some seat time, your suspension weak points will become more obvious and you can address them one by one. You want to do mods one by one so you can keep track of how they affect the car, and fine tune where necessary. The last thing you want to do is throw the catalog at it, because then if you make something worse you don't know what part did it.

As you hit the track, you'll likely make some friends who are knowledgeable and learn that many of the parts you're selecting now are not the best or are unecessary. Yet another reason to mod after you get some seat time, instead of before.

Lastly, if you plan on road coursing the car, you should drop any aspirations (see what I did there?) of adding boost. Boost makes a road course mustang ten times more difficult. If you didn't already have a heat problem, you will with boost. You will also likely overpower every other aspect of the car, brakes, tires, etc. It is just not a route I would recommend going.
 

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Since you're in Sacramento if you want to experience a short although fun day try this, https://www.hookedondriving.com/hooked-on-driving-region/Pacific-Northwest-Region
They use Thunderhill quite often. This is great way to get a taste of of driving your own car although it will in no way be to its limit and you do get seat time although somewhat limited...all you need is a SFI helmet.
The one issue with racing...be it drag racing, dirt track or on course racing...it's all about seat time and the more seat time the better you become...assuming you've had some really good coaching in the begining. The one thing the SCCA 3 day license event gives you is over 3 hours of seat time in a well set up race car...that is set up for that specific track...some really great coaches that are National SCCA winners...some multipal times...and it culminates on the last day with a full on race with 20/30 other students...just like any National SCCA Race where in a field of 30 Spec Miata's you have .2 seconds difference between number 30 and number 1.
When I got my license I was the oldest student by some 25 years and took it easy...on the last day I started dead last and finished 11th out of 31 cars...like I said, the most fun you can have with your pants still on.
One last comment and this holds true for any type of racing...It Ain't Cheap!, but for me it has been the thrill of a lifetime to race at Laguna Seca, Sears Point, Thunderhill and PIR.
 

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Camber Plates

Unless your going to drop your car more than "1 front and back, you won't need the Camber Plates.
 

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Unless your going to drop your car more than "1 front and back, you won't need the Camber Plates.
While this is an otherwise true statement, IF* he does want to do road course work, the caster / camber plates will allow him more favorable camber in those conditions.
 
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