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Ive decided to write this, seeing as ive done some brake work with my car that made a significant difference. I figure through my experience, I can help some people out since our cars arnt the lightest, and with mods, can become land missles.

Most of what im going to discuss is off-the-shelf items, and in many cases, factory replacements.

First, we'll discuss calipers. The factory calipers on the 5.0 Mustangs use a 60mm piston. This works well for a stock car being driven as its meant to be, but when you crank up the power, put some steam roller tires on, and abuse the brakes, youll feel their shortcomings. A solution to this...go to your local autoparts store. Order some calipers for a Lincoln Mark VII LSC. This is where the trick is. When you get calipers, there are two options. There is a phenolic piston, which is in a way like particle board, or a steel piston. The problem with the phenolic piston is they tend to distort with heat, and lock up. Order the steel piston calipers. You can use your Mustang calipers as a core when you swap them, they dont know the differnece.



They look dead stock, since they are externally the same as a Mustang caliper. I have 4 wheel disk, which is the reason for the 4 calipers.

Next item is rotors. This here is all in what you want to spend. I put a set of crossdrilled/slotted rotors on my car. In normal driving, you feel no difference, but when you abuse the brakes, you still feel no difference...because there is virtually NO fade what-so-ever. If you can afford drilled/slotted, definatly splurge on these, especially if you have some cobra wheels or any other open spoke wheel. I purchased some from ebay, and essentially, they are OEM replacement rotors, that have been put on a CNC machine and drilled, slotted, and chamfered. You can get them in zink plating, where the rotors will not rust, other than the friction area. Its well worth it if you're planning on showing your car. I personally used Mark VII rotors for a 5-lug conversion.



Up next is brake pads and shoes. Up front, buy the best pad for your application. Whats best for your application depends on a lot of things. Your car, your goals, your driving style, where you live, ect. I personally use Satisfied GR-5s. These pads are street/mild auto-x oriented, seeing as I drive like a lunatic. For brake shoes, dont skimp out here. Just because your rear brakes dont do nearly as much braking as the front, they are integral to your braking system. A good set of shoe's with fresh drums will help with nose dive. Id personally recommend some Satisfied Pro Performance shoes. While in the rear brakes, dont forget the installation kit, and get some new wheel cylinders, wether they are leaking or not. Many of our cars are close to 20 years old, dont trust 20 year old wear items.



You can see my choises in the backround. I spend almost 100 dollars in pads, but it was well worth it.

Now, heres something that most people overlook. Stainless steel brake lines. I personally had to make my own using Earls lines and fittings, but the Mustangs have many kits readily available. I HIGHLY recommend them. The brake pedal feel is increased emmensly. My Turbo Coupe uses a hydrolic booster for the brakes, and even still, the brake pedal feel drastically changed, and the braking is much more firm, due to the lack of rubber to expand.

Another recommendation is the Maximum Motorsports stainless steel caliper bushings. If youre familiar with the stock calipers, you would know that the caliper rides on rubber bushings. The bushings tend to wear, stretch, crack, and sometimes eject themselves. This causes the caliper to not ride perfectly perpendicular to the rotor, which reduces contact area between the pads and rotors. It can also cause you to eject a brake pad. Dont ask me how I know.



They look monsterous in the picture, but theyre actually not that large, but they make a significant difference in the braking.

While youre at it, completely flush the braking system. I can garentee that 95% of you havnt actually flushed the brakes the entire time youve owned the car. Brake fluid actually absorbs water, and regardless of how well sealed your brake system is, water does get in, little by little. Flush it with a good quality fluid, and you wont have to mess with it for a few years.

Other things to consider, this is the perfect time to do a 5-lug conversion. Rather than buying mustang drums and rotors, you could buy ranger drums, Mark VII rotors, and grab some ranger axles from the yard, and have yourself a 5-lug swap. Also while youre at it, you can take the calipers, paint them up real pretty, paint the wheel wells back to black, because we all know they stain brown over the years, and really clean up the look of your car.

If you follow this guide, youll have a fresh braking system that may end up having you pick your teeth out of your steering wheel. And it may look something like this:

 

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This is most definitely not for the 94-04. Notice the part about 5 lug swap? :)

This is geared more towards the foxes than anything, although some parts of it hold true for any year stang. The part about going out and buying Lincoln Mark VII LSC calipers definitely doesn't though.
More so for the 94-04 though. Since all this is stock on there.
But it can be applied to previous years.
 

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How so?

There is nothing specific to 94-04. There are several things specific to earlier years.

In all reality, it's not for Mustangs at all. Its about the Chevy Caprice, 'cause they have brakes too.
The components there are stock equipment on 94-04
 

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Like this article its geared right where I want it!Thanks for the info on that it will help me in my 5 lug conversion.
 
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