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My Dad and I have been fortunate enough to be able to purchase a new 2012 Ford Mustang, manual transmission.

It has been my very first manual transmission and I tell you it is very powerful. Aside from that, I was able to pick up accelerating and shifting quickly.

After I took it for a spin, I am now curious if anyone knows, or if there even IS, exact RPMs and clutch movements you need to get the most "push" with minimal or no lurching and tire spin.

Thank you in advance :)
 

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First things first, a soft break in is horrible for power, fuel economy and durability. You should drive it hard, don't run at one speed for very long, vary the RPMs and REDLINE IT for the first 1000 miles. This helps break the engine in correctly and will help it seal better. In fact, there's a specific process that you are supposed to do in the first 30 minutes of driving. See the link below for info.

Now, as for driving, OF COURSE there's better RPM/techniques! You want to balance power and traction. The more RPM you can give it without spinning, the faster you will take off. This just takes practice and sticky tires. The stickier the tires are, the higher RPM you can take off without spinning. For example, I have a 1998 mustang cobra. Stock it was 300ft-lb and 305hp. With modifications it's probably about 330hp now and down about 100lbs from stock. On 275/40-17 street tires, I had to leave at 4000rpm slipping the clutch on the drag strip to avoid spinning. When I bolted on a set of 26x11.50-16 Mickey Thompson slicks, even with no burnout, I could drop the clutch at 5000rpm and the tires wouldn't spin, the car would just leave. Also, pay attention to your shift points. Shift too early and you're losing speed because you aren't using the most power. Shift too late does the same thing.Ideally you want to shift where you will have the highest average power. Also, take some time to learn how to progress your shifting technique, but with those throttle by wire you might need to reprogram the computer first. Basically, learn to shift it as hard as you can right now. Then, learn to "Speed shift" comfortably. This is basically the same as what you probably do now. It's also called flat shifting. It's where you keep your right foot on the floor, press the clutch with your left and rip it into the next gear. Last, learn to powershift. This takes a lot of practice so you don't break things, but it's worth it. Powershifting is similar to speed shifting, but instead of pushing the clutch down, you have a different technique. While you're still accelerating, and I'll use shifting from first to second as the example, pull back on the shifter as hard as you are comfortable doing. Don't worry, you won't pull it out of gear, the rotational forces and helical cut gears will keep it engaged. Then, while still pulling back, right when you want to change gears, simultaneously "kick" the clutch pedal just enough to reduce the pressure on the gears while you yank back on the shifter as hard as you want/can. By doing this little kick shift, you're between gears for such a short period of time, you can cut 1-2 tenths off 1/4 mile time from each shift. Again using my car as an example, I crossed in 3rd gear, (I won't tell my times because I live in denver so it sounds really slow), I dropped about 1/2 a second going from traditional shifting to powershifting. No kidding. If you get really good, people will see you run, come talk to you and say "what transmission did you swap in" thinking you have an automatic because of the way it shifts. I've had that once. "I thought that was an automatic the way it sounded." Nope, just my shifting.
 

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well hopefully you had a big enough brain to let it break in for 1000 miles before you opened it up

also, its hard to tell you how to launch the car without knowing what options and what motor it has.....
 
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