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I have a 2013 v6 performance package. Today I was driving in a parking garage and I let off the gas popped it in nuetral and reved it some so I could hear it rev in a garage. After I reved it I put in back in drive and it held the rpm I was reving at while it was in nuetral. I put it back in Neutral and and lowered back to idle rpm. Is this normal?
 
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By referring to a gear as Drive, I Assume you have an Auto. With the Autos, if you rev it past 2k RPM in Neutral and put it back in drive, the car will not "go" again until the RPMs drop back below 2000. Also, the solenoid in the trans needs to fill up on the Auto before it can "go". Free revving it in Neutral on Autos can be dangerous. So be careful.

Yes, if you rev it to 5k RPM in Neutral and put it in Drive, it will stay at 5k RPM until you let it lower itself back down.

I also confirmed this by asking a guy at Bama....for whatever it might be worth. XD
 

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By referring to a gear as Drive, I Assume you have an Auto. With the Autos, if you rev it past 2k RPM in Neutral and put it back in drive, the car will not "go" again until the RPMs drop back below 2000. Also, the solenoid in the trans needs to fill up on the Auto before it can "go". Free revving it in Neutral on Autos can be dangerous. So be careful.

Yes, if you rev it to 5k RPM in Neutral and put it in Drive, it will stay at 5k RPM until you let it lower itself back down.

I also confirmed this by asking a guy at Bama....for whatever it might be worth. XD
So basically if I want to rev it I should do it while the car is in park?
 
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I would assume either would run a risk. Maybe someone else could also chime in. But I did experience the same thing on my 2014 V6.
 

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By referring to a gear as Drive, I Assume you have an Auto. With the Autos, if you rev it past 2k RPM in Neutral and put it back in drive, the car will not "go" again until the RPMs drop back below 2000.
I had noticed this too on my auto, as I sometimes would put it in neutral while coasting down a hill and saw that it held the RPMs (so no real gas savings putting it in neutral).

I generally don't rev in neutral or park, but when I do, I do it gently and not anywhere near redline. If you want to show off and be safe about it, you could put it in sport mode, throw it in 1st, and rev it...
 

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Revving in park is no different than revving in neutral as no gear is engaged. Its basically to keep you from "Neutral bombing" the car, which is revving high and slamming it in drive, similar to dumping the clutch on a standard. Its a feature to prevent damage to the transmission.
 

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I had noticed this too on my auto, as I sometimes would put it in neutral while coasting down a hill and saw that it held the RPMs (so no real gas savings putting it in neutral).

I generally don't rev in neutral or park, but when I do, I do it gently and not anywhere near redline. If you want to show off and be safe about it, you could put it in sport mode, throw it in 1st, and rev it...
You are going to damage your transmission if you continue to "put it in neutral while coasting down a hill".
 

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I have a 2013 v6 performance package. Today I was driving in a parking garage and I let off the gas popped it in nuetral and reved it some so I could hear it rev in a garage. After I reved it I put in back in drive and it held the rpm I was reving at while it was in nuetral. I put it back in Neutral and and lowered back to idle rpm. Is this normal?
Sorry but I'm not 100% clear on what you did.
Sounds like you rev'd in neutral, then put it in drive.
When did you actually lift up on the gas? Before, while or after shifting to drive?
Then while in drive it held the same RPM as what it was rev'd to in Neutral, without pressing on the gas.
You put it in neutral and that's when it went back to idle RPM.
When you were rev'g it, what's your estimate of RPM? Over 2000? Over 3000? etc?
 

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I don't do it any more (hence the past tense), and I'm not sure coasting a modern auto transmission in neutral is actually going to break it...especially since the 'stang transmission holds the revs up when you put it in neutral as per the OP.

Neutral drops are another issue entirely...that will definitely fry your trans.
 

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Because the transmission fluid does not flow through the same paths when the transmission is in neutral or park.
And my advice is exactly the same for manual transmissions... Leave the car in gear while it is in motion.

Some vehicles, equipped with manual transmissions, can be "flat towed" (Four wheels on the ground, towed with a tow bar) behind a motorhome, for instance, without suffering any damage. But the list of vehicles that are approved by the manufacturers to do so is very short... And Mustangs aren't on that list.

Coasting down a short hill at a reasonably slow speed, in neutral, is not going to hurt your transmission.
Coasting down a long hill (a couple of miles) at a fast speed (45+ mph) can potentially damage your transmission.

It's just not a good habit. And you're not going to save any appreciable amount of fuel by coasting.
Unless, of course, you turn the engine off...
 

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Because the transmission fluid does not flow through the same paths when the transmission is in neutral or park.
And my advice is exactly the same for manual transmissions... Leave the car in gear while it is in motion.

Some vehicles, equipped with manual transmissions, can be "flat towed" (Four wheels on the ground, towed with a tow bar) behind a motorhome, for instance, without suffering any damage. But the list of vehicles that are approved by the manufacturers to do so is very short... And Mustangs aren't on that list.

Coasting down a short hill at a reasonably slow speed, in neutral, is not going to hurt your transmission.
Coasting down a long hill (a couple of miles) at a fast speed (45+ mph) can potentially damage your transmission.

It's just not a good habit. And you're not going to save any appreciable amount of fuel by coasting.
Unless, of course, you turn the engine off...
I completely agree that there is no fuel economy advantage by shifting into neutral to coast down a hill. However, I have been building and modifying automatic transmissions for more than 35 years and I don't recall any that use a different bearing or bushing lubrication path in neutral vs. drive, as long as the engine is running.

If the engine is turned off when coasting then yes, bad things can happen as rotating components don't get the necessary lubrication they need because the pump runs at engine speed. Of course pressure paths for engagement of clutches and bands are different in neutral than in gear. So when when the transmission is taken out of neutral and put back into gear at any higher vehicle speed, any speed change the engine needs to go through at that time can accelerate wear on those clutches or bands, or even break things due to the trauma if the engine speed change is significant. However, the act of engine ON coasting itself should be OK unless there is something different about this trans that I am not aware of.

I was thinking maybe there is some specific knowledge about the Mustang auto we should all be aware of. However, unless I can see how the "lubrication" fluid path changes between neutral and drive with a running engine, preferably using a manufacturer's hydraulic circuit diagram, the coasting part that practice should be harmless.
 

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And I have NOT been rebuilding and modifying automatic transmissions for 35 years... I have to pay for it to be done.
:(

That's about what the transmission guys have been telling me throughout the years. Something about pressure difference. You are the first transmission guy that I have ever heard say that it was ok to coast an automatic transmission. Perhaps it was because the guys that I was speaking to, were going to be the ones fixing my transmission if it broke under warranty.
 

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Because the transmission fluid does not flow through the same paths when the transmission is in neutral or park.
And my advice is exactly the same for manual transmissions... Leave the car in gear while it is in motion.

Some vehicles, equipped with manual transmissions, can be "flat towed" (Four wheels on the ground, towed with a tow bar) behind a motorhome, for instance, without suffering any damage. But the list of vehicles that are approved by the manufacturers to do so is very short... And Mustangs aren't on that list.

Coasting down a short hill at a reasonably slow speed, in neutral, is not going to hurt your transmission.
Coasting down a long hill (a couple of miles) at a fast speed (45+ mph) can potentially damage your transmission.

It's just not a good habit. And you're not going to save any appreciable amount of fuel by coasting.
Unless, of course, you turn the engine off...
Be careful what you say about turning your engine off. Someone may take you seriously.:D
 

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For the record, I don't really consider myself an automatic transmission guy, despite having built and modified many in my past. I learn new things about them all the time and there might indeed be something to learn about this particular trans since I admittedly have no experience with it.

My guess is that what was meant by the caution was a real concern about coasting any automatic transmission with engine OFF. This is much more than a safety concern (no power steering or brakes in most cases, not to mention that the steering column may lock on you).

There were some very early automatic transmissions that had the pump driven by the tail shaft, and those would be exempt from the concern and could even be push started. However, it has been more than 50 years that automatic transmission pumps have been driven by the engine so the engine must be running for the vehicle to be pushed or pulled with the drive wheels on the ground.

I have one experience where I engaged in modifying an auto trans with an external electric pump, specifically so the vehicle could be moved safely with the engine OFF (a hybrid mode), which worked as intended, but that was no easy task.

Perhaps someone here can look at the hydraulic diagram and clarify whether the Mustang 6 speed auto can be pushed or pulled in neutral safely with the engine running. I don't have easy access to that diagram myself, but I could interpret such a diagram if it was provided to me.
 

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Yes. Engine off coasting will guarantee you a toasted transmission.
They actually have external automatic transmission pumps on the market now. They are for the RV crowd that wants to flat tow an automatic transmission equipped vehicle. They're quite sophisticated, with a monitoring system inside of the tow vehicle, to warn the driver of any problems with the pump.
 

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Perhaps it was because the guys that I was speaking to, were going to be the ones fixing my transmission if it broke under warranty.
So these were Ford stealership guys telling you this? That's your answer right there... ;)
 
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