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Discussion Starter #1
I've posted in this forum previously about some work I'm doing to my 2002 GT. Specifically, I'm replacing the alternator; both battery cables; water pump; radiator; radiator hoses & thermostat; electric radiator cooling fan; A/C condenser; (1) A/C hose; A/C accumulator, and heater core. The catalyst for doing all of this work was the need to replace that underhood wire harness that the power distribution box is a part of (I guess it's sometimes referred to as the headlight harness). I wasn't really having problems with any of these components, but due to the car's age and mileage (103,000, which I realize it's relatively low for an almost 18 year old car), and the fact some of those components had to be removed, I decided to replace them for preventative maintenance reasons (in the case of my heater core, I replaced my floor carpeting earlier this year with NOS Ford OEM carpeting, and I don't want my nearly 18 year old heater core leaking all over my new carpeting I paid roughly $375 for!).

Anyway, I also want to at this time replace the oil filter adapter gasket. It's not leaking, but I had to have that gasket replaced on my 4.6 liter '97 T-Bird I used to own, so I figured I might as well do it now to my Mustang, especially since the radiator; all radiator hoses, and battery cables are removed from the car, and are not in my way.

Has anyone here replaced that gasket, before? I'm wondering why the Ford service manual would specify to first drain the engine oil - the filter & the adapter are mounted on the block, higher up than the oil pan. I'm hesitant to do that, unless absolutely necessary, as I've got expensive Royal Purple oil in my motor, which was just changed a couple of months prior to the car being put to on jack-stands (it's been up on them, without the motor having been run at all, for roughly three months, now). I'd just rather not drain it, then put it back in, unless removing the filter & adapter is going to cause all my oil to somehow leak out.

So, anyone know if it's absolutely necessary to drain the oil pan, first?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
So, who here has replaced their oil filter adapter gasket? What did you use/what do you recommend using to clean the stuck on gasket material left on the block? I've got my adapter off of the block, and I tried using a plastic gasket scraper, but that's basically useless. Is there some gasket remover chemical that someone could recommend that works well in softening up/dissolving the gasket material, so it can be more easily scraped off? I'm even thinking of trying to use a Dremel tool with some abrasive finishing pads/attachments - not a good idea?
 

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I wouldn't... And no idea why its like that, I've pulled many of those adapters off of 20+ year old blocks and the gasket comes right off clean, even re-usable. The one in my car now has the original 1996 gasket on it and dry as a bone lmao.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
I wouldn't... And no idea why its like that, I've pulled many of those adapters off of 20+ year old blocks and the gasket comes right off clean, even re-usable. The one in my car now has the original 1996 gasket on it and dry as a bone lmao.
You responded before I had a chance to update - I've got it all worked out. I bought a better scraper at Home Depot, yesterday - it has a sharp metal edge, almost like a carbide tip. It had no problem scraping off what little gasket material was left on the block. And, I say little, because what I originally thought was stuck on gasket material turned out to be mostly just marks left on the machined part of the block, from where the gasket had sat sandwiched between the block & the adapter for nearly 18 years. After scraping, I finished up by using some fine steel wool, and now that area is totally smooth and shined up really nice. I've also got the machined surface of the adapter cleaned up nicely, and will be putting that all back together later today.

On a side note, the new gasket I got from the Ford dealer appears to be a much improved design, at least as far as durability/longevity would be concerned. It looks to be made out of a silver-colored metal (with gasket material in the appropriate areas, of course). The one that came off my car appears to be made primarily of a black plastic.

Yes, mine was dry as a bone, too, without any evidence whatsoever of leaks. I just thought it prudent, though, to replace it now, as I've got the radiator and all the radiator hoses removed, as well as both battery cables (all those parts are being replaced with new), and access was easier. Since the car is nearly 18 years old and has 103,000 miles on it, I thought might as well do it now, instead of having to mess with it at some later time.
 
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