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Hi, I have a 1967 mustang with an inline 6 motor. I'm in the process of swapping out the worn manual for a rebuilt C4. I have everything I need but am stuck on one part of re-assembly. The torque converter bolts to the flexplate, which is bolted to the back of the engine block, but how does the inspection plate fit in their? That bolts to the bottom of the bellhousing, correct? Does it go between the rear of the engine and the flexplate before bolting up? If you do it after the flexplate then you won't have access to all the tc to flexplate bolts. Any help would be great. I'm fairly comfortable doing this work but I don't want to mess up my new tranny!
 

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First of all... I gotta correct you on something.
the torque converter does NOT bolt up to the flex plate. It bolts up to the "flywheel" --- that bolts up to the crankshaft at the back of the engine, nearer to it's center. The flywheel is the big round part with the teeth (or gears) that go all around the outside. Your starter kicks out a drive gear that meshes with the flywheel's teeth to turn the engine over.
The flex plate is a steel plate that's in between the engine block and the transmission bell-housing.
You are correct, the inspection plate is a cover that bolts at the bottom of the bell-housing. AND that's it. It has a couple of bolts that hold it into place. It doesn't go in between ANYTHING.
You put the inspection cover on - AFTER - you bolt up (and tighten) the torque converters nuts to the flywheel, on the studs that are on the torque converter. And also (of course) the bolts that connect the engine to the tranny bell-housing.
When you drop the engine in, you put the flex plate on either; the tranny bell-housing OR the back of the engine block, depending on which one has the guide pins for the flex plate (I think it's the engine block). You spin the torque converter around to line up the studs on it with the holes in the flywheel so they match up.

This whole process is MUCH easier if you pull the tranny with the engine, then assemble them together... Then drop in the engine/transmission in as an entire unit. It requires a little more of this and that BUT it beats trying to line everything up, shaking the engine around and taking a chance of bending your flex plate, cracking the tranny bell-houising or damaging the torque converter/flywheel in the process........ Especially IF you're gonna pull the tranny anyway.
 

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first off im not likeing the fact that your changing over to auto trans rather a wast of a good old car but you will need to put the inspesion cover after you have trans inlace and bolted together
 

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Alfonzo, the questioner is correct in using the term "flexplate".........what you are referring to is the "block plate". The block plate fits between the engine and flexplate. Failure to use the block plate will create starter pinion/ flexplate ring gear clearance issues. The inspection plate has a bead rolled into it on the top, it's actually the lower extension of the block plate....that top edge extends up into the bellhousing area. This is why it's not a flat stamping. The concave side faces the front of the engine bay. You must bolt the converter to the flexplate (automatics do not use flywheels, those are for the clutch assemblies of manual transmissioned vehicles...automatics use flexplates, Alfonzo....) The inspection cover slides up into the bellhousing area and then bolts down to the lower bellhousing bolts. The should be a couple of tabs for the inspection cover to engage the block plate.
 
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