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Some surfaces can draw moister(spelling?) out of the tire causing them to dry rot and crack. Some spray on shines do the same thing. For example while my bike is up
For the winter I keep the tires off the wood floor with front and rear stands. With a car, jack stands at all four corners will work. The back two on the axel, and for the front I'd put them under the front A-arms.

Off the car, standing is fine if they are shifted regularly. Same with in their sides. Someone else may chime in with more specific tips.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
deadsp0t said:
Some surfaces can draw moister(spelling?) out of the tire causing them to dry rot and crack. Some spray on shines do the same thing. For example while my bike is up
For the winter I keep the tires off the wood floor with front and rear stands. With a car, jack stands at all four corners will work. The back two on the axel, and for the front I'd put them under the front A-arms.

Off the car, standing is fine if they are shifted regularly. Same with in their sides. Someone else may chime in with more specific tips.
I read something about storing in air tight bags. Wonder if I should let out the air in the tires. Plan to refill with nitrofill.
 

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Tires are good for up to 6 years from the date of manufacture period, Most manufactures warranty their tires for 5 to 6 years depending on who the brand name is because after decades of data collection and lawsuits paying out tons of money, this is the maximum recommended usage and life span of the rubber. it doe's not matter if this tire is in usage or not, 6 years, thats it. The only manufacture i know to vary on this is Michelin, they put 6 years from date of purchase. And thats nuts...

nothing you do to them under "normal" circumstances is going to accelerate or decelerate that process. Of course common sense rule applys here, rubber drys out because the oils in it evaporate, so use some common sense, don't store them in sunlight or other heated places, protect them from the enviroment (ozone)as much as is possible for your circumstance. The cracking on the sidewalls is actually called "ozone cracking" in the industry.
 

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I love tire topics. They are my life

Common things people dont know about tires that can help them out a ton.

There is a simple 4 digit code, the last 4 of the DOT number on the side of the tire. They represent the week and year of the tires make date.
i/e : MGSD H212 2411 - These tires were made in the 24th week of 2011.

Heat is a tires worst enemy. The one thing I ask people all the time is "does your car sit in a garage or on the driveway?" Why ask this question? because its simple Most people who buy tires and have their cars sit outside, park in the same spot all the time, and in the same way. Well if your cars drivers side faces sunset, and your car sits their forr a few hours, then come home and the suns down, well your going to have a more obvious dry rot on the side of the tire that gets the most sun. (same goes for work parking spaces)

The first couple ingredients in tire shine, actually eat away at rubber. Fun fact of the day for most people. I only use tire shine whenever I am going to a show, and never more. If you want your car to look good, use some good old fashion soap and water.

as for storing tires in the winter. There is no good or bad way to do this other than. If they are on wheels, deflate them, and lay them on their sides. If they are off the wheels, just barrel stack them. Look at it this way. My inventory holds about 2000 tires. If they can survive cold winters in a non heated warehouse, so can your tires.

Hope this helps and if we have any questions at all regarding tires. Hit me up.

Josh
 

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oh one more important tip, if you are storing them on surface you care about? put a layer of plastic between them and the surface, the black pigment in the rubber will leave a ring that is very very difficult to get out
 

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Discussion Starter #11
JBillone said:
Thanks for the info! Thanks to Poloka for starting this thread!
NP. Figure spend good $$ on some sweet wheels and tires that want them to last. So warm now I wish I'd had waited to switch over to my winter tires. However, my 285/35R19 snow tire does look pretty fat out back.
 
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