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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
So I am considering going with a set of 35mm Wheel Spacers on the back of my 13 GT with stock wheels. MY question is, has anyone on here done this with Stock 18" wheels? If so could I get some pics posted up? Also has anyone had any issues with them? Oh and one more question lol, should I go with 25mm or the 35mm spacer? Thanks guys!
 

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I've heard nothing but horrible stories about wheel spacers, that they break other components on the suspension (wheel studs, for example). I can't imagine they would be good for handling, either. Never used them myself though. I would recommend that you just invest in wider wheels/tires in the back if you are going for the look.
 

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I would only ever use a small hub centric spacer and no more than 5mm on stock studs. If you did ARP studs you could use a little more
 

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Nothing wrong with good quality billet alum. wheel spacers when installed properly.
Cast alum. spacers and spacers with over sized or universal stud holes will absolutely break studs.
Road race cars and oval track cars use them constantly and have zero issues and they have more power and traction and corner harder that any street car ever will.
I have raced professionally for decades and know this to be true.
 

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Nothing wrong with good quality billet alum. wheel spacers when installed properly.
Cast alum. spacers and spacers with over sized or universal stud holes will absolutely break studs.
Road race cars and oval track cars use them constantly and have zero issues and they have more power and traction and corner harder that any street car ever will.
I have raced professionally for decades and know this to be true.
While this may be true, real racers will spend the cash on reinforced wheel studs and quality spacers. Most mustang owners will hit up amazon or American muscle for the cheapest ones available and just slap them on without a care
 

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I too agree. I ran a 1 inch spacer on the rears for about 4 years. Never had a problem. I invested in correctly offset wheels and no longer needed them. For style purposes, not bad. But personally I don't think I would have run these at the track. Too risky for my taste. I'd say save your money and get wider tires if that's what you're going for. Peace of mind and they'll look sick.
 

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I have run hub centric 25mm spacers on the rear of my 2000 GT for 5 years. The car is a street car and tracked on weekends including a track day at Lowes Motor Speedway at higher speeds. The rear studs are stock and original. I have never had a problem. I have since went with a wider wheel and different offset and have removed the spacers as a previous poster suggested. I also run 25mm hub centric spacers on the rear of my 2015 GT which I occasionally track. Purchase good quality hub centric spacers and you will not have any trouble.
 

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Never Ever on the Front Steering wheels,
Like everyone tells you, CHANGE THE STUDS on the rear drive wheels.
Torque them properly and recheck them after about fifty miles.
And "DON"T FORGET THE LOCTITE.
Ronnie
 

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Here is a 10 year old 1 1/4" thick spacer from the rear of my 700 rwhp mustang gt.
While I had it in the shop awhile back the mechanic slid it into a curb during a test drive and broke the wheel, bent the axle and snapped the rotor.
The only part that did not break was the spacer. It is still on the car today.
I also have had them on the front for 10 years. Zero issues.
I've been using spacers since the 1970's with no problems.


 

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Fabman, any chance you know the brand and/or model of the spacers you use?
Got them off eBay.
As long as it's a 6061-T6 aluminum spacer you will be fine.
The spacer is vastly stronger than most wheels will ever be.
Hubcentric spacers are even better.....but this one was a cheapie and you can see how strong it is.
 

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Spacers are broken down into two groups:

The kind that slip over the studs and the kind that have a set of their own studs as pictured above. Either is fine if used properly.

The slip over kind need to fit the stud properly. If the hole is too big it will not support the stud and the studs will break. If the holes fit snugly it will be as strong or stronger than the wheel. The problem is that the studs are only so long so longer studs must be used at some point, or the dual stud setup like above should be used. Don't bother to loctite the studs because as soon as you re torque the spacers the bond with the loctite will be broken and made useless. Just buy good spacers, make sure they stay tight and don't worry about it.
 

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Good choice.



This is the type to avoid as I mentioned earlier.


They are cast aluminum and the holes offer no stud support.
These are what gave spacers a bad name as plenty of them have failed over the years.






These are made by Sparco. This is typical of what a road race car would use.
Notice how the hole fits the stud snugly....this is an acceptable and very common method as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Lots good info thank you. Fabman those billet ones are the ones I was considering. So I do plan on getting wheel and tire package but that want be for a year or so. Meanwhile I think I give it a try, I don't road race or anything like that but do plan on hitting the drag strip but again that won't be till next year. I figure $70 for spacers and if need be I can purchase arp extended studs for 139.
 
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